Month: August 2019


Physicists close two loopholes while violating local realism


first_imgPhysicists performed a Bell experiment between the islands of La Palma and Tenerife at an altitude of 2,400 m. Starting with an entangled pair of photons, one photon was sent 6 km away to Alice, and the other photon was sent 144 km away to Bob. The physicists took several steps to simultaneously close the locality loophole and freedom-of-choice loophole. Image credit: Thomas Scheidl, et al. and Google Earth, ©2008 Google, Map Data ©Tele Atlas. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — The latest test in quantum mechanics provides even stronger support than before for the view that nature violates local realism and is thus in contradiction with a classical worldview. By performing an experiment in which photons were sent from one Canary Island to another, physicists have shown that two of three loopholes can be closed simultaneously in a test that violates Bell’s inequality (and therefore local realism) by more than 16 standard deviations. Performing a Bell test that closes all three loopholes still remains a challenge, but the physicists predict that such an experiment might be “on the verge of being possible” with state-of-the-art technology. More information: Thomas Scheidl, et al. “Violation of local realism with freedom of choice.” 19708-19713, PNAS, November 16, 2010, vol. 107, no. 46. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1002780107 The physicists, who belong to the group of Rupert Ursin and Anton Zeilinger and were all at either the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna or the University of Vienna when performing the experiments in 2008, have published their study on the new Bell test in the early edition of PNAS. As they explain in their study, local realism consists of both realism – the view that reality exists with definite properties even when not being observed – and locality – the view that an object can only be influenced by its immediate surroundings. If a Bell test shows that a measurement of one object can influence the state of a second, distant object, then local realism has been violated.”The question of whether nature can be understood in terms of classical concepts and explained by local realism is one of the deepest in physics,” coauthor Johannes Kofler told PhysOrg.com. “Getting Bell tests as loophole-free as possible and confirming quantum mechanics is therefore an extremely important task. From a technological perspective, certain protocols of quantum cryptography (which is entering the market at the moment) are based on entanglement and violation of Bell’s inequality. This so-called ‘unconditional security’ must in practice take care of the loopholes in Bell tests.”The physicists explained that, in experimental tests, there are three loopholes that allow observed violations of local realism to still be explained by local realistic theories. These three loopholes can involve locality (if there is not a large enough distance separating the two objects at the time of measurement), the freedom to choose any measurement settings (so measurement settings may be influenced by hidden variables, or vice versa), and fair sampling (a small fraction of observed objects may not accurately represent all objects due to detection inefficiencies).Previous experiments have closed the first loophole, which was done by ensuring a large spatial separation between the two objects (in this case, two quantum mechanically entangled photons) so that measurements of the objects could not be influenced by each other. Special relativity then ensures that the objects cannot influence each other, since no physical signals can travel faster than the speed of light. In these experiments, classically unexplainable correlations were still observed between the objects, indicating a violation of local realism. (The fair sampling loophole was closed in another earlier experiment using ions, where large detection efficiencies can be reached.) Debunking and closing quantum entanglement ‘loopholes’center_img Citation: Physicists close two loopholes while violating local realism (2010, November 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-physicists-loopholes-violating-local-realism.html Explore further In the current experiment, the physicists simultaneously ruled out both the locality loophole and the freedom-of-choice loophole. They performed a Bell test between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, located 144 km apart. On La Palma, they generated pairs of entangled photons using a laser diode. Then they locally delayed one photon in a 6-km-long optical fiber (29.6-microsecond traveling time) and sent it to one measurement station (Alice), and sent the other photon 144 km away (479-microsecond traveling time) through open space to the other measurement station (Bob) on Tenerife. The scientists took several steps to close both loopholes. For ruling out the possibility of local influence, they added a delay in the optical fiber to Alice to ensure that the measurement events there were space-like separated from those on Tenerife such that no physical signal could be interchanged. Also, the measurement settings were randomly determined by quantum random number generators. To close the freedom-of-choice loophole, the scientists spatially separated the setting choice and the photon emission, which ensured that the setting choice and photon emission occurred at distant locations and nearly simultaneously (within 0.5 microseconds of each other). The scientists also added a delay to Bob’s random setting choice. These combined measures eliminated the possibility of the setting choice or photon emission events influencing each other. But again, despite these measures, the scientists still detected correlations between the separated photons that can only be explained by quantum mechanics, violating local realism.By showing that local realism can be violated even when the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes are closed, the experiment greatly reduces the number of “hidden variable theories” that might explain the correlations while obeying local realism. Further, these theories appear to be beyond the possibility of experimental testing, since they propose such things as allowing actions into the past or assuming a common cause for all events. Now, one of the greatest challenges in quantum mechanics is simultaneously closing the fair-sampling loophole along with the others to demonstrate a completely loophole-free Bell test. Such an experiment will require very high-efficiency detectors and other high-quality components, along with the ability to achieve extremely high transmission. Also, the test would have to operate at a critical distance between Alice and Bob that is not too large, to minimize photon loss, and not too small, to ensure sufficient separation. Although these requirements are beyond the current experimental set-up due to high loss between the islands, the scientists predict that these requirements may be met in the near future. “Performing a loophole-free Bell test is certainly one of the biggest open experimental challenges in the foundations of quantum mechanics,” Kofler said. “Various groups are working towards that goal. It is on the edge of being technologically feasible. Such an experiment will probably be done within the next five years.” Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more


Researchers uncover reason why mole rats are oblivious to acid pain


first_imgNaked Molerat Heterocephalus glaber eating. Image: Wikipedia. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Perhaps even more interesting is the fact that because they live so close together underground, carbon dioxide builds up in their den to levels that would kill most other mammals, and because oxygen levels are low too, an environment exists that would prove painful for most animals due to acid buildup in tissues. Mole rats are impervious to pain from acid though, a fact that has intrigued scientists for years. Most assumed they simply had different types of nociceptors than other mammals. But that’s not the case, as Gary Lewin and his colleagues from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin write in their paper published in Science. Instead, it appears the mole rats have a species specific variant of a certain sodium channel.In order to feel things such as acid burn, animals have sensory neurons in their tissues, the tips of which have channels called nociceptors which control the flow of sensory information to the neuron, which is responsible for sending electrical signals to the brain. Channels can let things through, or slam shut blocking things off depending on the cause of the stimulation. In the case of acid, nociceptors for most mammals are stimulated and partially close, but let enough of the sensory information pass through to allow the brain to feel the pain acidic substances create. Oddly enough, the team found that to be the case with mole rats too, which meant they had to look elsewhere. In this case that meant looking at another type of sodium channel, called NaV1.7, which they found became blocked when exposed to acid.This new discovery by the team means they have discovered that an animal doesn’t have to have a unique type of nociceptor in order to be free from acid pain, all that’s necessary is a change in the NaV1.7 channel that directs the flow of information passed on to neuron below. This is quite a find because it could lead to ways to alleviate certain kinds of pain that people experience, such as inflammation from arthritis. Journal information: Science More information: The Molecular Basis of Acid Insensitivity in the African Naked Mole-Rat, Science, 16 December 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6062 pp. 1557-1560. DOI: 10.1126/science.1213760ABSTRACTAcid evokes pain by exciting nociceptors; the acid sensors are proton-gated ion channels that depolarize neurons. The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is exceptional in its acid insensitivity, but acid sensors (acid-sensing ion channels and the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel) in naked mole-rat nociceptors are similar to those in other vertebrates. Acid inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents is more profound in naked mole-rat nociceptors than in mouse nociceptors, however, which effectively prevents acid-induced action potential initiation. We describe a species-specific variant of the nociceptor sodium channel NaV1.7, which is potently blocked by protons and can account for acid insensitivity in this species. Thus, evolutionary pressure has selected for an NaV1.7 gene variant that tips the balance from proton-induced excitation to inhibition of action potential initiation to abolish acid nociception.center_img Study: Why cold is such a pain © 2011 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Mole rats aren’t the prettiest things; living underground as they do, they more resemble Gollum from the Lord of the Rings trilogy than other rats or mice. But they’re interesting to scientists nonetheless because they have some interesting traits. They live for twenty years for example, and none of them ever get cancer. Citation: Researchers uncover reason why mole rats are oblivious to acid pain (2011, December 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-12-uncover-mole-rats-oblivious-acid.htmllast_img read more


New type of bioegradable nanogenerator for use inside the body does not


first_img(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Beihang University, both in China, has developed a biodegradable triboelectric nanogenerator for use as a life-time designed implantable power source in an animal body. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances the team describes their nanogenerator, its possible uses and the ways it can be tweaked for use in different applications. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists have been working on developing internal devices for many years and several have been created and are now in use inside human patients—the pacemaker is the most well known. But to date, all such devices suffer from the same deficit—none run using an internal power source, which means they must rely on batteries. While batteries are convenient, they tend to run out of power, which means a patient must undergo a surgical procedure to have them replaced and surgical procedures by their very nature are risky because they open the body to possible infection. A better way, as the researchers with this new effort point out, would be to have implantable devices running off a power source that is generated inside the body, such as capturing heat or making use of the movement of blood. The new device they have created generates electricity via triboelectricity—where electricity is generated when two materials touch each other and then separate, one of the common ways that static electricity comes about.The new device consists of two strips of multi-layered material. One of the strips has a flat film outer layer, the other strip has nanometer sized protruding rods on its exterior—when the two strips meet and then pull away, a tiny amount of electricity is created. The layers are kept apart by blocks of a biodegradable polymer; electricity is generated as parts of the body moves in a way that causes the two strips to come into contact and then to pull apart—over and over.Testing of the device showed it was capable of producing a power density of 32.6 milliwatts per square meter, which they found was enough to power a neuron-stimulation device used to steer the way neurons grow. The team claims their device has paved the way for a new generation of internal devices, noting that not only is it biodegradable, but it can be tuned to self-destruct over days, months or even years. Similar devices, they note, could be made to work by utilizing the power from a person breathing or from their heart beating. Photographs from BD-TENG at various stages of the degradation time line suggest that devices encapsulated in PLGA were initially resistant to mass degradation. However, after 40 days, significant mass loss and structure disintegration was initiated. Near-total mass loss was observed at 90 days. Credit: Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501478 Journal information: Science Advances Explore furthercenter_img Citation: New type of bioegradable nanogenerator for use inside the body does not need external power source (2016, March 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-03-bioegradable-nanogenerator-body-external-power.html More information: Q. Zheng et al. Biodegradable triboelectric nanogenerator as a life-time designed implantable power source, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501478AbstractTransient electronics built with degradable organic and inorganic materials is an emerging area and has shown great potential for in vivo sensors and therapeutic devices. However, most of these devices require external power sources to function, which may limit their applications for in vivo cases. We report a biodegradable triboelectric nanogenerator (BD-TENG) for in vivo biomechanical energy harvesting, which can be degraded and resorbed in an animal body after completing its work cycle without any adverse long-term effects. Tunable electrical output capabilities and degradation features were achieved by fabricated BD-TENG using different materials. When applying BD-TENG to power two complementary micrograting electrodes, a DC-pulsed electrical field was generated, and the nerve cell growth was successfully orientated, showing its feasibility for neuron-repairing process. Our work demonstrates the potential of BD-TENG as a power source for transient medical devices. © 2016 Phys.org Team builds implantable piezoelectric nanoribbon devices strong enough to power pacemaker (w/ Video)last_img read more


Using tellurium nanoparticles to achieve plasmoniclike and alldielectric properties when exposed to


first_img Citation: Using tellurium nanoparticles to achieve plasmonic-like and all-dielectric properties when exposed to sunlight (2018, August 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-tellurium-nanoparticles-plasmonic-like-all-dielectric-properties.html As the search for renewable resources continues, some in the field have turned to studying the possibility of adding materials to water to make it easier to produce steam for driving a turbine. Several years ago, one team of researchers discovered that adding nanoparticles to water could cause it to produce steam when exposed to sunlight. Since that time, scientists have continued experimenting with adding nanomaterials. Meanwhile, other experiments have suggested that plasmonics could play a role in photothermal conversion. In this new effort, the researchers have found a material that allows nanoparticles to offer the benefits of both approaches.The work by the team in China was straightforward. They created nanoparticles made out of tellurium and then mixed them into a container filled with water and tested the result to see what changes it might have wrought.The researchers report that adding the nanoparticles improved the evaporation rate by a factor of three. Testing showed that they could raise its temperature from 29°C to 85°C in just 100 seconds by shining sunlight on it. The researchers found that this improvement was possible because the nanoparticles behaved like plasmonic nanoparticles—but only when smaller sized nanoparticles (less than 120 nanometers) were involved. Nanoparticles that were larger than 120 nanometers behaved like an all-dielectric. Mixing nanoparticles of both sizes into the same container of water allowed the sample to take on both characteristics—the team claims the resultant material is the first to demonstrate both properties.The researchers acknowledge that commercialization of their technique would be problematic because of the difficulty in manufacturing the different sized nanoparticles in sufficient quantities. They note that they are looking into ways to make them using another approach. But they also note that if they succeed, the concept has other applications, such as creating new kinds of extremely small antennas or sensors. © 2018 Phys.org Explore further More information: Churong Ma et al. The optical duality of tellurium nanoparticles for broadband solar energy harvesting and efficient photothermal conversion, Science Advances (2018). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aas9894AbstractNanophotonic materials for solar energy harvesting and photothermal conversion are urgently needed to alleviate the global energy crisis. We demonstrate that a broadband absorber made of tellurium (Te) nanoparticles with a wide size distribution can absorb more than 85% solar radiation in the entire spectrum. Temperature of the absorber irradiated by sunlight can increase from 29° to 85°C within 100 s. By dispersing Te nanoparticles into water, the water evaporation rate is improved by three times under solar radiation of 78.9 mW/cm2. This photothermal conversion surpasses that of plasmonic or all-dielectric nanoparticles reported before. We also establish that the unique permittivity of Te is responsible for the high performance. The real part of permittivity experiences a transition from negative to positive in the ultraviolet-visible–near-infrared region, which endows Te nanoparticles with the plasmonic-like and all-dielectric duality. The total absorption covers the entire spectrum of solar radiation due to the enhancement by both plasmonic-like and Mie-type resonances. It is the first reported material that simultaneously has plasmonic-like and all-dielectric properties in the solar radiation region. These findings suggest that the Te nanoparticle can be expected to be an advanced photothermal conversion material for solar-enabled water evaporation. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Journal information: Science Advances Typical morphology and structure characterization results of Te nanoparticles prepared by ns-LAL. Credit: Science Advances (2018). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aas9894 How gold nanoparticles could improve solar energy storage A team of researchers at Sun Yat-sen University in China has created a material with dual solar properties by adding tellurium nanoparticles to water—it showed both plasmonic-like and all-dielectric properties when exposed to sunlight. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their material and its possible uses.last_img read more


Lab experiments offer credence to theory that subducted crust exists at the


first_img © 2019 Science X Network Explore further A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found evidence that offers credence to a theory that subducted crust exists at the base of Earth’s upper mantle. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes experiments they conducted in their lab involving pressurizing material believed to exist in the mantle, and what they found. Johannes Buchen, with the California Institute of Technology, has written a News & Views piece on the work in the same journal issue. Citation: Lab experiments offer credence to theory that subducted crust exists at the base of Earth’s upper mantle (2019, January 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-lab-credence-theory-subducted-crust.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: Steeve Gréaux et al. Sound velocity of CaSiO3 perovskite suggests the presence of basaltic crust in the Earth’s lower mantle, Nature (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0816-5center_img Journal information: Nature Prior research has suggested that as tectonic plates shift around, some of the material on the surface is pushed below. Prior research has also suggested that such material would likely sink deep into the mantle because it is denser than the pyrolite that is believed to make up most of the mantle. Researchers theorize that that the subducted material would likely settle in the bottom of the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle—but to date, there has been little evidence backing up this theory. The primary test has been analyzing seismic waves traveling through such material, but these readings have two possible explanations—the first is that differences in the speed of waves traveling through material in the area is due to dehydration melting. The other is that it is surface material that has drifted down into the mantle. In this new effort, the researchers report that they believe they have found evidence that supports the latter theory.The researchers started by noting that the crust beneath the oceans is made mainly of basalt. They also noted that prior research showed that when basalt makes its way into the crust, a mineral called calcium silicate perovskite (CaSiO3) is created. Thus, if crust material made its way to the transition zone, it would be in the form of CaSiO3. But CaSiO3 exists in two configurations depending on its environment—at high temperature and high pressure, it has cubic symmetry. At lower temperatures and pressure, such as on the surface, it has tetragonal symmetry. That meant the team had to subject a sample of the crystal to pressure and temperatures approximately equal to that found in the mantle to test it. Once they succeeded, they sent ultrasonic waves through it to see if they matched what theory had suggested. They found that the cubic form of CaSiO3 did, indeed, slow the waves in approximately the same way as they do when passing through parts of the mantle, suggesting that the material there is very nearly the same. And that suggests the material is, indeed, subducted crust. Subducting slabs of the Earth’s crust may generate unusual features spotted near the core This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


A new quasi2D superconductor that bridges a ferroelectric and an insulator


first_img , Nature Materials © 2019 Science X Network The idea of forming a quasi-2-D superconducting layer at the interface between two different compounds has been around for several years. One past study, for instance, tried to achieve this by creating a thin superconducting layer between two insulating oxides (LaAlO3 and SrTiO3) with a critical temperature of 300mK. Other researchers observed the thin superconducting layer in bilayers of an insulator (La2CuO4) and a metal (La1.55Sr0.45CuO4), neither of which is superconducting in isolation.”Here we put forward the idea that thin charged layer on the interface between ferroelectric and insulator is formed in order to screen the electric field,” Viktor Kabanov and Rinat Mamin, two researchers who carried out the study, told Phys.org via email. “This thin layer may be conducting or superconducting depending on the properties of the insulator. In order to get a superconducting layer, we chose La2CuO4 – an insulator that becomes a high Tc superconductor when it is doped by carriers.”The heterostructure fabricated by Kabanov, Mamin and their colleagues consists of a ferroelectric magnetron sputtered on the surface of the parent compound of high Tc superconductor La2CuO4. At the interface between these two components, the researchers observed the appearance of a thin superconducting layer, which attains its superconductivity at temperatures below 30K. The researchers detected the layer’s superconducting properties by measuring its resistivity and via the Meissner effect. They found that a finite resistance is created when applying a weak magnetic field perpendicular to the interface, which confirms the quasi-2-D quality of the layer’s superconductive state. “The key advantage of our technique is the relative simplicity of the creation of the heterostructure, because the requirements for the roughness of the surface are not so stringent,” Kabanov and Mamin said. “On the other hand, the changing the polarization in the ferroelectric allows to control the properties of the conducting layer.” Kabanov, Mamin and their colleagues are the first ever to observe superconductivity on the interface between a ferroelectric and an insulator. In the future, their approach and the superconductors they fabricated could inform the design of new electronic devices with a ferroelectrically controlled superconductivity. “As far as plans for the future are concerned, we would like to learn how we can control the superconducting properties of the interface by rotating the polarization of the ferroelectric,” Kabanov and Mamin said. “Another idea is to try to control the properties of the interface by laser illumination. This is basically the direction we are working on now.” Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. Their study, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, is the first to achieve superconductivity in a heterostructure consisting of a ferroelectric and an insulator. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Dmitrii P. Pavlov et al. Fabrication of High-Temperature Quasi-Two-Dimensional Superconductors at the Interface of a Ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 Film and an Insulating Parent Compound of La2CuO4, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.237001 Jian-Feng Ge et al. Superconductivity above 100 K in single-layer FeSe films on doped SrTiO3, Nature Materials (2014). DOI: 10.1038/nmat4153High-temperature interface superconductivity between metallic and insulating cuprates. arXiv:0810.1890 [cond-mat.supr-con]. arxiv.org/abs/0810.1890 Journal information: Physical Review Letters The schematic structures of Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3/La2CuO4 (a) with q2DEG (shown in red); AFM image of the La2CuO4 single crystal surface without the film (b) illustrates the inhomogeneity of the interface. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (c), and the temperature dependence of the resistivity (d) of La2CuO4 single crystal (without ferroelectric film). Credit: Dmitrii P. Pavlov et al., arXiv:1804.05519 [cond-mat.supr-con] Electric-field-controlled superconductor-ferromagnetic insulator transition Citation: A new quasi-2D superconductor that bridges a ferroelectric and an insulator (2019, June 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-quasi-2d-superconductor-bridges-ferroelectric-insulator.html Explore furtherlast_img read more


Journeys and bonds


first_imgPavitra Bandhan is a journey of two strangers Aashima and Girish, who are not suppose to meet by any means but destiny brings them not only under the same roof but also binds them in a relationship of lifetime. Aashima is a small town girl, born and brought up in a middle class nuclear family. Her father is a mill worker and he had to struggle his entire life to make two ends meet. Aashima loves her family and follows her family values religiously. She is young, kind hearted and generous girl for whom her family is the priority. She wants to share the burden of her father and wants to build a home for him.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’On the other hand Girish Roy Chowdhury is the owner of saree mill in which Aashima’s father is an employee. Girish hails from an influential family in Murshidabad and has built his empire with his own hard work and persistence. His principles are based on the experiences of the life. Though Aashima and Girish belong to different worlds , are different personalities but similarity between them is they live for their families. As the story unfolds we will see the journey of these two strangers, with their share of trials and tribulations , coming from different worlds, different mindsets but as destiny has it but will always be bonded by the thread of love , sacrifice and devotion that is why it will hold the title of being a Pavitra Bandhan- Do Dilon Ka. Yash Tonk, Hritu Dudhani, Yamini Thakur, Shabnam Sayeed, Shailley Kaushik, Munni Jha, Shalini Arora, Rajat Dahiya are main cast in this serial.The serial will be aired every Monday-Friday, 9 September onwards at 8.30 PM only on DD National.last_img read more


Trading high


first_imgThe 34th edition of India Trade Promotion Organisation is going to commence in the Capital. The event will be inaugurated by President of India, Pranab Mukherjee, on 14 November at Hamsadhwani Theatre, Pragati Maidan. The partner country this year is South Africa, Thailand is the focus country whereas Delhi is the focus state. The theme of the fair is ‘Women Entrepreneurs’. Over 25 women enterpreneurs from the partner country will be exhibiting their final products at the event. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Over 6500  participants  from India and abroad are taking part in the fair. Countries like – Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bahrain, China, Cuba, Egypt, Germany, Hong Kong, Iran, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia,  Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Thailand,  Tibet, Turkey, UAE and Vietnam are taking part in this grand event this year.  There are 31 Central Government Ministries, Departments along with their agencies/PSUs, while all the States and  UTs apart from leading private sector companies will bring up the domestic sector.‘Committed to the new mantra of Make in India, the fair will also focus on the PM Modi’s cleanliness drive, Swachh Bharat Mission’, an official said during a press meet.Various cultural programmes have been organised all throughout the fair. The first five days of the fair i.e 14-18 November will be exclusively for the business visitors only.last_img read more


DRI seizes exotic birds smuggled from Bangladesh


first_imgKolkata: The Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI) has seized exotic birds which were smuggled from Bangladesh into West Bengal, an agency statement said today. Acting on a specific input, DRI officials intercepted a vehicle at a place along Kalyani Expressway near here and found three red and blue macaws, three eclectus parrots, eight pygmy falcons and seven white ducks, it said. The birds were found badly crammed up in plastic bags kept in the boot of the car, the statement said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights These birds were illegally brought into the country from Bangladesh through Indo-Bangla border in North 24 Parganas district, it said. The probe agency said it immediately contacted the office of the principal chief conservator of forests, West Bengal and also the director of Alipore zoo, Kolkata. The birds were handed over by the DRI to the zoo. In March this year, the agency had seized 214 Indian star tortoise in Kolkata. Less than a month back, two hollock gibbons, an endangered species under the Wild life Protection Act, 1972 and two palm civets, another endangered species, along with a variety of exotic birds, which had been smuggled into the country from Bangladesh seized by the DRI. “There is an urgent need to step up the fight against wild life crime, which has environmental, social and economic impact and a concerted effort is needed by all the law enforcement agencies in combating the same,” the agency said.last_img read more


Indulging in delicacies of spring


first_imgIt is often seen that vegetarians struggle to eat authentic dishes and very few places offer what suits their palate. To ease the struggle, Chef Veena Arora from the Imperial shares the recipie of Tauhu Nerng- chilled silky bean curd with basil which is a part of Spice Route’s Vegan Special at The Imperial, New Delhi, which will be on from March 12 till 20. The curated menu will offer a perfect tease to your senses with mock meat as a star ingredient and keeps you light, this season.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’TAUHU NERNG- chilled silky bean curd with basilIngredients:• Bean curd silky- 1 no.• Lemon grass- ½ tsp• Basil- 5 gms• Light soya sauce- 5 ml• Gelatin- ¼ sheet• Kaffir leaves- 5 gmsMethod:Soak gelatin in water and heat it. Blend the beancurd. Blend the lemongrass. Put kaffir leaves into a very thin thread. Mix all the above ingredients and light soya. Take a mould and line it with clean wrap and pour the above mixture. Chill it for 3 hours and serve it on a bed of basil.last_img read more


CID takes over probe of Kajipara blast


first_imgKolkata: The Criminal Investigation Department (CID) of the state has taken over investigation of the Kajipara blast case. On Wednesday, all the documents and evidences have been handed over to CID by the Barrackpore Police.Immediately after the investigation was handed over, a CID team led by Deputy Inspector General (DIG) Pranav Kumar visited the spot in the afternoon. Apart from CID, a team from the Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL) also visited the spot. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSources informed that as per direction from Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, CID took over investigation of the case. On Wednesday afternoon, investigators visited the flats in the building in front of which the blast took place on Tuesday. The owners and residents of the flats were also questioned.Later, CID officials measured the distance of damaged points from the blast spot. The shutter opposite the blast spot, which was also damaged, was opened. After opening the shutter it was found that a splinter had penetrated the shutter and damaged a showcase inside. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedCID officials also looked for Close Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras present in the locality, to find out what actually happened. As no CCTV camera was available, sleuths turned towards the conventional method of enquiry by questioning the locals. According to CID sources, it is being suspected that the bomb which exploded on Tuesday was bigger than average socket bombs. Ammonium nitrate and acid were also used to intensify the blast. The cap at the bottom of the bomb was tighter than the upper one. As a result, most of the explosion was directed upwards, which cracked the windows inside the blast radius. Experts have collected samples and sent them for necessary examination.last_img read more


Store and clean your jewellery the right way


first_imgOnce you buy precious jewellery, it’s essential to store your expensive pieces in the right manner to avoid losing the sheen of the metal. Remove your jewellery while doing household chores, says an expert. Jewellery should never be tossed into a drawer or on top of a dresser as that will scratch and damage it. Following are some tips to help you protect your ornaments:*Diamond jewellery: To clean your diamonds, use a good quality jewellery cleaning solution that is easily available in the market. You can also mix some ammonia and water to clean your diamonds at home. You should always remove your jewellery while doing household chores like cooking, cleaning, dish washing. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf*Gold jewellery: If proper care is not taken, gold can lose its sheen and can become dull. Always clean your gold jewellery with a mild detergent, lukewarm water and a soft cloth. It is always advisable to keep your gold chains and bracelets in separate boxes as they can get entangled easily. Gold should be removed before diving into a chlorinated swimming pool as chlorine has a very harsh effect on gold. The chemical can weaken it.*Pearl jewellery: Just as the sun’s harmful rays can damage our skin, light and heat can affect a coloured gemstone’s durability and colour. Over time, and in excess, they can also fade or damage some gemstones, pearls and other delicate materials such as ivory which will bleach under extreme exposure to light. Always clean your pearls gently with a damp cloth, dry them off and store them in an airtight container. Never use plastic pouches to store your pearls, rather keep your pearls in a pouch that has soft lining. Always wear your pearl jewellery only after applying make-up. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveKeep your pearls away from perfumes, make-up and hairsprays as they can cause discolouration. Never use baking soda or bleach to clean them. Do not swim when you are wearing pearl jewellery as chemicals in the water can destroy your precious pearls.*Silver jewellery: Exposure to chemicals can damage or discolour silver. Never wear them while swimming or doing household work.To clean your silver jewellery, use a phosphate-free detergent or just soap water. Rinse it off and wipe it with a soft and clean cloth. Never store your silver jewellery with any other metal as it tends to tarnish faster.last_img read more


Space Theatre at Science City to transform into 2D3D digital unit


first_imgKolkata: Visitors of Space Theatre at Science City will soon have a unique viewing experience in terms of content and technical quality with the switch from 2D analogue to 3D digital. The theatre which remained shut since March 1, 2017, due to renovation, will be unveiled with a new avatar by the middle of January 2019.”The time has come to switch to digital with the advancement in technology. We had been running the content in analogue format for 20 years. There will be six projectors in place of the old standalone projection system — the sound quality will be world class. The pioneering German manufacturer of optical systems Carl Zeiss is implementing the entire project,” said Subhabrata Chaudhri, director of Science City. The total project cost is around Rs 20 crore. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe six new projectors that will replace the old system have been procured from Christie, the US-based manufacturer of projectors and digital cinema devices. The 23m tilted dome is being designed and installed by Astro-Tec Manufacturing of the US. “Back in July 1997, when the dome was inaugurated for the first time, it was in seismic zone II compliant but now it has been made seismic zone IV compliant,” a senior official said. The air conditioning system and the sitting arrangement will also witness a change in the new dome though there will be no change in the capacity. There will be a total of 360 seats with more leg space and better reclining ability. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”There will be 8 to 10 shows per day and the price of tickets for the show is expected to go up with the viewing experience seeing a total change. The latest digital content will be screened in ultrahigh definition and also in 3D, giving viewers the feel of ‘being there’,” a official said. Space Theatre at Science City is India’s first and the first film that was screened was Serengeti, which documents the journey of more than two million wild beasts, zebras and antelopes over 500 miles across the Serengeti plains in Tanzania. Science City, which operates under the National Council of Science Museums, had sent its proposal for an upgrade to the Union ministry of Culture in September 2015. The approval came in March 2016.last_img read more


Supportive spouses boost wellbeing


first_imgPeople with supportive spouses may experience more personal growth, happiness, psychological well-being, and better relationships, a study suggests. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in the US found that people with supportive spouses were more likely to take on potentially rewarding challenges. “We found support for the idea that the choices people make at these specific decision points — such as pursuing a work opportunity or seeking out new friends — matter a lot for their long-term well-being,” said Brooke Feeney, lead author of the study published in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe researchers brought 163 married couples into the lab and gave one member of each couple a choice: either solve a simple puzzle, or they were given an opportunity to compete for a prize by giving a speech. They then recorded the couples’ interactions as they decided whether to take on the challenge.Participants with more encouraging partners were substantially more likely to decide to compete for the prize, while those with partners who discouraged them or expressed a lack of confidence more often chose the simple puzzle.last_img read more


Tracing the changing face of Indian contemporary art


first_imgFusing together some of the finest works from well established artists, the art exhibition at All India Fine Arts and Crafts Society aims to serve the audience a visual bonanza. Titled Genesis-18, the art show will be held from June 1-7. Genesis-18 is an exposition by 34 artists in a manner that traces a timeline of developments in style, themes and schools of what has emerged today as Indian contemporary art.The striking feature of the works of the participating artists is the manner in which they straddle diverse cultures whilst still voicing the present context of Indian social, cultural and political life. The canvases provide an introspective and sometimes uneasy glimpse into modern India, yet are collectively global in their presentation. This exhibition is a recognition of and respect for the influential antecedents of this genre of art. Clearly, the map has changed as these works demonstrate figurative and abstract, impatient yet unhurried, ancient spirituality fused with modern culture.It is amazing to discern the similarity in the direction of thoughts of all artists, coming from diverse milieus and diverse backgrounds.last_img read more


Hearing loss may up cognitive decline with age Study


first_imgNew York: Hearing impairment is associated with accelerated cognitive decline with age, though the impact of mild hearing loss may be lessened by higher education, researchers say. The findings suggest that those with more serious hearing impairment had worse performance at the initial visit on a pair of commonly used cognitive assessment tests. However, the association of mild hearing impairment with rate of cognitive decline was modified by education, said the researchers at University of California, San Diego. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”We surmise that higher education may provide sufficient cognitive reserve to counter the effects of mild hearing loss, but not enough to overcome effects of more severe hearing impairment,” said senior author Linda K McEvoy, Professor at the varsity. For the study, published in the Journal of Gerontology: Series A Medical Sciences, the research team tracked 1,164 participants with a mean age 73.5 years of whom 64 per cent were women. All had undergone assessments for hearing accuracy and cognitive function between 1992 and 1996 and had up to five subsequent cognitive assessments at approximately four-year intervals. None used a hearing aid. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey found that almost half of the participants had mild hearing impairment, with 16.8 per cent suffering moderate-to-severe hearing loss. The team said that mild hearing impairment was associated with steeper decline among study participants without a college education, but not among those with higher education. Mild hearing impairment was associated with steeper decline among study participants without a college education, but not among those with higher education. Moderate-to-severe hearing impairment was associated with steeper cognitive decline regardless of education level, the researchers said.last_img read more


Celebrate patriotism at The Imperial


first_imgCelebrate 73rd Independence Day with patriotic fervour at 1911 Restaurant over a Freedom special lunch buffet, offering tricolor themed treats. The menu includes an array of signature dishes featuring the likes of Hariyali Bunno – chicken marinated with mint and coriander, Basanti Jheenga – jumbo prawn marinated with hung curd and cheese, Ajadi ke Gole – cottage cheese dumpling served with saffron gravy, Tiranga Pulao – trio colors of rice and much more, complemented with a dessert like Kesaria Phirni – saffron rice pudding flavoured with cardamom. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfWhen: August 15 Where: 1911 Restaurant Timings: 12:30 pm – 2:45 pm Buffet Price: INR 6000 + taxes for two peopleSavour hand-crafted thalis like Maharani Thali featuring vegetarian specials and Maharaja Thali offering non- vegetarian favourites. Enjoy these curated Thalis inclusive of a four- course menu with family and friends at our Pan Indian restaurant Daniell’s Tavern, to commemorate the occasion. Where: Daniell’s Tavern Timings: 6:30pm – 11:45pm (Dinner) Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivePrice : INR 3500 + taxes per Maharani Thali and INR 4500 + taxes per Maharaja Thali The experience gets more indulgent when you take on a culinary journey inspired by the flavours of India with regional Thalis specially put together by the chefs of 1911 Restaurant along with a mocktail, for an irresistible dinner. Feast on the traditions of our country with Rajasthani Thali on August 15, Punjabi Thali on August 16, Kerala Thali on August 17, Kashmiri Thali on August 18, Delhi-6 Thali on August 19, South Indian Thali on August 20 and Lucknowi Thali on August 21, 2019. Celebrate the spirit of freedom and satiate your dining experience at in the midst of unique Indian history and heritage, only at The Imperial. Where: 1911 Restaurant Timings: 7:00 pm – 11:45 pm Price : INR 3000 + taxes per Thali with mocktaillast_img read more


The Cursed Mansion – Tudor Estate with a Harrowing Past now up


first_imgParnham House was once one of the most impressive (and cursed) Tudor mansions in England, brought to glory in the 1520s and then remodeled in the early 19th century by John Nash, the most celebrated architect of the Regency. It is set on 131 acres of park land that are described as “magnificent.” Now it’s for sale for $3.9 million (£3 million), but there’s a catch. A big one. The mansion was ravaged by fire a year ago under very mysterious circumstances and has an illustrious, yet harrowing past.Its recent owner, Michael Treichl, an Austrian-born financier, spent 15 years restoring the vast house. The 2017 fire was considered suspicious, and Treichl has since drowned.Photo by CRAIG BAKER/WILTSHIRE AND DORSET FIRE SERVICEKnight Frank is putting the house on the market, calling it “an opportunity of a lifetime.” While the park land is gorgeous and the house illustrious, the fire has left it “completely derelict, requiring total restoration.”“Whoever takes on the huge project will have to consult Historic England due to the grand property being Grade I Listed,” reported Dorset Echo.Lion Gate’ to the Walled Garden of Parham House, West Sussex, England. photo by Acabashi CC BY SA 4.0The house is set away from the road, rising on grounds that include stone statues and topiary that have remained unchanged for centuries.For two centuries Parnham House belonged to the Strode family, who took possession in the mid-1500s, when Richard Strode married Elizabeth Gerard, whose ancestors built the first house on the site in about 1400.Parnham House. Photo by Sarah Smith CC By Sa 2.0During the English Civil War, the house saw tragedy. On July 5, 1645, while protecting house and home from the Roundheads, Lady Strode was “brutally killed by a soldier under the command of Colonel Fairfax,” said the Dorset Echo.In 1810 William Oglander, a new owner, commissioned the famed John Nash to restore and enlarge the house. Nash also worked on the 19th century enlargement of Buckingham Palace.Evidence of his work in Parnham includes distinctive winding staircases and stone mullioned windows.Parnham House Deer Park photo by geograph uk CC By SA 2.0In 1896 Vincent Robinson moved in, followed by Hans Sauer, “who was keen to restore the Tudor interior,” according to Dorset Life. The Rhodes-Moorhouse family followed; William Rhodes-Moorhouse was the first airman to win the Victoria Cross in World War One. His son was killed in the Battle of Britain.During the 1920s Parnham was a country club. “Visitors included Arthur Conan Doyle and the Prince of Wales,” wrote Town & Country.Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan DoyleIt was requisitioned during World War 2 for the American army. In 1956 the house became a nursing home until 1973. It had been empty for three years when it was bought for $140,000 by John and Jennie Makepeace for their School for Wood Craftsmen, where leading cabinet makers were trained.In 2009, Dorset Life raved over the work done on the house by financier Michael Treichl and his wife, Emma, a former model: “They have exceeded expectations in re-creating the grandeur of a Grade I listed stately home and at the same time the more intimate atmosphere of a delightful family home.”Photo by CRAIG BAKER/WILTSHIRE AND DORSET FIRE SERVICE.With the guidance of English Heritage and top architects, the segregating hallways, corridors and stud walls were removed. Daylight now pours into the once-dark rooms. “But what has also been achieved can only be described as a kind of room reverse psychology,” said Dorset Life. “Whilst the rooms have been made bigger, instead of finding them loft-like and unfriendly, you feel drawn into them and compelled to stay within the comfort they offer.”Reportedly Treichl spent $14 million on restoring and improving the house.A general view of Parnham House, an Elizabethan manor house, Netherbury, Dorset, June 1997. (Photo By RDImages/Epics/Getty Images)But on April 15, 2017, a suspicious fire raged throughout Parnham. Almost immediately, the BBC and other media outlets reported the fire as “suspicious.” In the press, it became a major story. “In 32 years it’s one of the most intense fires I’ve ever seen,” said Beaminster fire commander Mark Greenham.Treichl was arrested for arson, telling the media, “The restoration of Parnham has been my life’s work and it is insane to think I could have destroyed it.”Two months later, while on bail, Treichl was found, drowned, in Lake Geneva, Switzerland. Legal authorities then closed the investigation of the fire.Read another story from us: To the Moon! Jackie Gleason’s Space-Age Party Retreat – now up for SaleThe sale is somewhat urgent. A report from the government concluded that stabilization work should be carried out soon to prevent “likely” collapses of the walls.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at *Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone*, and *InStyle*, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more


Charles Dickens Pet Raven Inspired Edgar Allen Poes Most Famous Work


first_imgThe Raven is one of Edgar Allen Poe’s most impressive works, a long narrative poem centered on a talking raven that makes a nocturnal visit to a distraught lover, who is mourning the death of his beloved Lenore. Noted for its seamless weaving of popular myth, folk tales, classical imagery, and the supernatural, the poem remains a widely acclaimed and popular classic.However, Poe’s raven has a little known and significant literary heritage. Historians and literary critics have long speculated that the talking bird in his famous poem was actually inspired by Charles Dickens’ own pet raven, Grip.Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven,” 1875. Digitally restored.This real-life raven was responsible for spawning not one, but two literary greats, as he was also the basis for the bird depicted in Dickens’ own novel, Barnaby Rudge.According to the BBC, Dickens was particularly fond of birds and owned several pet ravens, all affectionately named Grip.His first and favorite bird had a distinctive, imperious character, and would frequently harass Dickens’ children and other pets, nipping their ankles.Dickens in New York, 1867.Dickens was fascinated by Grip, and resolved to include him in his next novel.In 1841, he published Barnaby Rudge, and indeed, the title character was constantly accompanied by a talking pet raven, which was far more intelligent than the man himself.Dickens widely acknowledged that the character was based on his own bird, which had unfortunately died shortly before the publication of the novel.The Raven depicts a mysterious raven’s midnight visit to a mourning narrator, as illustrated by John Tenniel (1858).Dickens was deeply saddened by Grip’s death, and continued to acquire birds; first an eagle, and then two more ravens in succession, both also named Grip.The third Grip had an even more distinctive and domineering character than the first, and was even able to keep the family dog, a bullmastiff named Turk, under control.Turk would sit patiently as Grip helped himself to all of the best pieces of meat from the dog’s dinner plate.Cropped photograph of Charles Dickens.According to the BBC, it was around this time that Dickens and Poe became acquainted. Poe had written an approving review of Barnaby Rudge, and the two arranged to meet when Dickens and his wife were on tour in the United States.Reportedly, Poe saw a picture of Grip that Dickens carried with him, and was delighted to learn that the bird he had admired in Barnaby Rudge was based on a real-life animal.Portrait of Poe by William Abbot Pratt from September 1849, a month before his death.Shortly after, Poe composed his most notable work, a narrative poem with an imperious raven at its heart. The main character, a love-struck and sorrowful young man, is struck by the visitation of a raven, whose croaking refrain, “Nevermore,” simply adds to his grief.Although Poe never stated it explicitly, it is widely thought that The Raven is based on Dickens’ bird.Manet’s illustration of the raven flying through the window.The disdainful character of the bird, described as standing proudly on the window ledge, perfectly matches the raven belonging to Barnaby Rudge, and thus, to Dickens’ own bird. Poe’s raven is also seen tapping at the window, just as the raven in Barnaby Rudge had been prone to do.Soon after the poem’s publication, other readers and literary critics also noted the similarity, with some even accusing Poe of plagiarism. Always a controversial character, Poe attracted a considerable amount of criticism and ridicule from his literary peers.Original burial spot of Edgar Allan Poe in Westminster Burial Ground, Baltimore. Photo by JefferyGoldman CC BY-SA 4.0In 1848 the writer James Russell Lowell wrote, “Here comes Poe with his raven, like Barnaby Rudge / Three-fifths of him genius, two fifths sheer fudge.” Poe’s sad and untimely death just one year later cemented his legacy, and The Raven remains his best-known and most-loved work.When the original Grip died, Dickens was so upset that he had him stuffed by a taxidermist and kept him in his office, allowing him to keep watching over the family.Read another story from us: Nevermore…The Unanswered Questions Surrounding the Final Days of Edgar Allan PoeAfter Dickens’ death he was sold at auction and is now a permanent resident at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rare Books department. A fitting end for a bird that inspired not one, but two literary geniuses.last_img read more


VIDEO Lance Stephenson expects his first home game back with the Pacers


first_imgLance Stephenson just signed with the Pacers after bouncing around the league for the last several years. He had his best years as a pro with Indiana, including playing a key role in two playoff runs to the Eastern Conference Finals in 2013 and 2014.Even though Stephenson is a certified bench player at this point in his career,”Born Ready”‘s confidence isn’t the least bit shook.In a recent interview, when asked what he expected the atmosphere to be like when he took the floor for the Pacers again, Stephenson said he thought it would be, “like Michael Jordan coming back to play in the NBA or something like that.”Yeah, something like that Lance. Advertisement Here’s the delusional video:I asked Lance what he thinks Tuesday will be like…. His answer might be the most Lanciest thing ever: pic.twitter.com/DplfhkdXgv— Michael Grady (@Grady) April 1, 2017last_img read more