Tag: 上海夜网QN


Students work to stop AIDS


first_imgThis winter break, several USC students will travel to Africa with a team of 40 people to take part in “Steps over Swaziland.”SOS is a campaign intended to bring relief and awareness to Swaziland, a small country in Africa that has the highest incidence of HIV/AIDS.According to Abhirukt Sapru, a sophomore majoring in business administration who will be taking part in the trip, statistics predict that by the year 2020, the AIDS epidemic could be responsible for the death of Swaziland’s adult population.“A lot of the funds and resources are going to much bigger countries with problems of less magnitude,” Sapru said. “What we hope that SOS will do is draw people’s attention to Swaziland and actually help people understand the real dire problems that are going on there.”One World Futbol Project collaborated with FUNDaFIELD, a non-profit organization co-founded by USC students Garrett Weiss and his brother, Kyle, to organize SOS.The organization fundraises to build soccer fields in impoverished communities. The One World Futbol Project joined FUNDaFIELD to provide highly durable — if not entirely indestructible — soccer balls to complement the fields, Garrett Weiss said.“We’ll be going to about five [community centers] and holding soccer tournaments there, doing clothing exchanges — that kind of thing for the orphanages — as well as giving out AIDS awareness information the entire time and lots of AIDS prevention resources,” said Garrett Weiss, a sophomore majoring in business administration.The USC students on the FUNDaFIELD team will be dribbling one of One World’s soccer balls across Swaziland — a journey that is approximately 130 miles.They will run about 10 to 15 miles each day and deliver the One World soccer balls, jerseys and HIV/AIDS resources at community centers for orphans along the way, Weiss said.FUNDaFIELD plans to construct a field at El Shaddai orphanage, the last stop on their trip.To some, the idea of devoting funds to developing soccer fields and distributing balls might seem to detract resources from solving the severe problems at hand, such as HIV/AIDS, said Tim Jahnigen, inventor of the One World Futbol.However, both FUNDaFIELD and the One World Futbol project acknowledge the significance soccer has on children in poverty, Jahnigen said.“Play and sports reinforce community and conflict resolution and all kinds of things,” Jahnigen said.Jahnigen said he was inspired to create a lasting soccer ball for the One World Futbol Project after watching a documentary about the children in Darfur refugee camps who resorted to playing soccer with balls made of trash. Although many relief efforts have been put in place to help these children, the soccer balls provided don’t last long before they are punctured or otherwise destroyed, he said.“Our vision is to support the work of organizations like FUNDaFIELD,” Jahnigen said. “If you can provide a ball that doesn’t go flat into an environment that is incredibly poor but full of children, it allows the children to play to their hearts’ content instead of until the ball is destroyed.”One World hopes to distribute one million balls to poor communities across the globe within three years, Jahnigen said. So far, around 15,000 balls have been provided through donations and their “buy one, give one” commercial program.“When I had the idea for the ball, it was only meant for children in harsh environments and the idea of making money off of it or making a business out of it was the last thing on my mind. It was just really thinking about children, their needs,” Jahnigen said. “That part of the story has always been the major driving force behind the project.”For SOS, Jahnigen said he hopes to be able to provide between 500 to 1,000 balls for the FUNDaFIELD team to deliver to Swaziland.“We’re all ecstatic, we’re all really looking forward to it,” Sapru said. “We all just can’t wait.”Weiss said he is also enthusiastic for the upcoming SOS trip.“Once you go to Africa, you are able to realize the effects of your work and you’re able to see what else needs to be done,” Weiss said. “When you go, you just get so excited to do more and I’m hoping that’s what comes out of this for everyone else on the trip.”last_img read more


Badgers hope to get back on track


first_imgSenior guard Rae Lin D\’Alie\’s Badgers have lacked their trademark stingy defense and have shot a miserable 37.9 percent from the field in their past five games.[/media-credit]A lack of energy and intensity never seemed to be among the Wisconsin women’s basketball team’s faults.Through the sprints, scrimmages and drills, the Badgers consistently appear loud and energetic. However, having lost two of their last three after a four-game win streak in January, energy and intensity is exactly what the Badgers (17-7, 7-6) find themselves looking to improve as Indiana (13-10, 6-6) visits the Kohl Center Sunday evening.“I think that we need to crank it up a notch,” junior forward Tara Steinbauer said. “I think that our practices need to be more intense. I think that for games, the next five games are really huge for us, and I think we need to come out focused and mentally prepared for each and every one of those, and I think that starts in practice.”After falling to Purdue on a shot with two seconds remaining last Sunday, Wisconsin finds itself looking to refocus as postseason play approaches. After a successful January that saw the Badgers pick up wins over four quality Big Ten opponents, including a Jan. 14 road upset 48-45 of then-No. 20 Michigan State, Wisconsin has struggled.In its last five games, UW has allowed opponents to score an average of 60.2 points per game — much higher than the team’s Big Ten-leading average of 53.9. Additionally, Wisconsin has shot only 37.9 percent from the field in that span, compared to its season average of 42.7, which is good for third in the Big Ten. Together, these shortcomings on both sides of the ball have left Wisconsin searching for consistency, especially in the second half of games.“Our ability to finish the game,” head coach Lisa Stone noted as one of her team’s recent struggles. “[We need to] make free throws and do some of the details down the stretch, continue to defend as we’re defending and rebound… get more people involved offensively.”Fortunately for Stone’s squad, leading scorer Alyssa Karel survived a scare Sunday after awkwardly landing on her right knee while going for a steal. Averaging 14.1 points per game and consistently keying the Badgers’ offensive attack, the junior guard practiced Tuesday and is back at full strength, according to Stone.Riding a two-game win streak, Indiana will look to exploit Wisconsin’s recent defensive struggles with an up-tempo attack. Sophomore forward Danilsa Andujar is the Hoosiers’ tallest player at 6-foot-2, while the Badgers’ pair of junior forwards, Steinbauer and Lin Zastrow, stand at 6-foot-1 and 6-foot-4, respectively. As a result, Indiana relies on their transition game to trigger fastbreaks and provide easy buckets, as well as an aggressive matchup zone.“They’re a very good defensive team,” Stone said. “They rebound the ball hard. They penetrate really hard to the basket. …They’re good in transition, they’re good at getting to the basket, and, defensively, they play a matchup zone that tries to disrupt your flow. It’s important that we improve on our areas of turnovers and toughness with the ball and find ways to get good shots.”Leading the way for the Hoosiers’ offense are guards Jori Davis and Jamie Braun. Davis, a junior from Rochester, NY, is the Big Ten’s fourth-leading scorer with 17.7 points per game, while Braun, a Wisconsin native, contributes 11.6. Complementing the veteran guard duo in the starting lineup is 6-foot-1 junior forward Hope Elam, junior guard Whitney Lindsay, and Danilsa Andujar.“They’re going to play hard, they always play hard against us,” Wisconsin senior guard Rae Lin D’Alie said. “They’re going to come out with a lot of energy, we have to match that and have more. Our defense has definitely got to be on point. A lot of their guards can score; they have a post player [Elam] who can shoot the three, who can drive, who can make moves inside. So we’re going to have to be ready defensively, definitely.”For the Badgers, taking care of the ball will be at a premium. Despite ranking 56th in the nation in turnovers per game, Wisconsin has gave the ball away an average of 21.5 times over the last two games.“One of the biggest things for us is going to be taking care of the ball,” Steinbauer said. “I think we need to show some toughness with the ball up top.”Under her tenure, Stone’s teams have been known for stingy defense and safe offensive play, so the Badgers’ recent stretch is a reason for concern.“Stay focused on details, take one game a time, redeem ourselves at home,” Stone said of her expectations for Sunday. “It’s important that we come out with some energy and we play harder, longer.”last_img read more


Clippers’ role players make their marks in blowout victory against Kings


first_img“We try to emphasize playing harder than most teams,” Wilson said. “We’ve still got guys out and other guys still have to step up. Lately, we’ve been using that as our talent just to out-play people defensively and turn that into easy offense for us.”If there was any rust after two days of rest, recovery and holiday celebrations, it wasn’t evident in the Clippers’ game during the second quarter. They recovered smartly from a lackluster finish to the first, when they led by as many as nine points before the Kings tied it at 30-all.Unlike their loss to the Grizzlies, when Rivers and Williams carried them, the Clippers had no shortage of contributors Tuesday. Wilson got them started by topping his previous career high of 13 points with 14 in the first quarter. Dekker, Teodosic and Williams really got them rolling in the second.The Clippers extended their lead to 95-73 entering the fourth quarter and five players had scored 10 points or more. Saturday, Rivers and Williams were the only Clippers to score in double figures. Rivers had 38 and Williams scored 36, but no one else was in double figures.It seemed effortless Tuesday against Sacramento (11-22).Griffin and Gallinari watched intently from the sideline. They weren’t needed, but they were missed. Griffin (sprained knee) could be back in the starting lineup Friday against the Lakers, with Gallinari (torn glute muscle) expected to be back a little while later.“They’re going to come in and play hard, their going to move the ball,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said of the second unit. “They have kind of figured that part out and scoring just happens. It’s strange with that group. I can’t tell you who’s going to score, but it just happens.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousLA Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell, left, pulls a rebound away from Sacramento Kings forward Justin Jackson during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III #10 lost the ball against LA Clippers forward Sam Dekker #7 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LA Clippers forward Jamil Wilson #13 blocks a shot by Sacramento Kings guard Garrett Temple #17 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsSacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III #10 runs into LA Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell #0 and LA Clippers forward Sam Dekker #7 on his way to the hoop in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LA Clippers guard Austin Rivers #25 gets past Sacramento Kings guard Garrett Temple #17 for 2 points in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Sacramento Kings guard George Hill #3 goes to the hoop against LA Clippers center DeAndre Jordan #6 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein #00 lost the ball against LA Clippers forward Jamil Wilson #13 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LA Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell #5 blocks a shot by Sacramento Kings center Kosta Koufos #41 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LA Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, shoots past Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers forward Sam Dekker, right, shoots over Sacramento Kings forward Zach Randolph during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, right, shoots around Sacramento Kings guard Malachi Richardson during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers center DeAndre Jordan dunks over Sacramento Kings forward Justin Jackson during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, left, dunks over Sacramento Kings center Kosta Koufos during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers center DeAndre Jordan shoots past Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LA Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell, left, pulls a rebound away from Sacramento Kings forward Justin Jackson during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III #10 lost the ball against LA Clippers forward Sam Dekker #7 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 14Sacramento Kings guard Frank Mason III #10 lost the ball against LA Clippers forward Sam Dekker #7 in the first half. The Los Angeles Clippers played the Sacramento Kings at Staples Center. Los Angeles, CA 12/26/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — Jamil Wilson scored a career-high 14 points on 5-for-6 shooting in the first quarter. Milos Teodosic tied his personal best with eight assists by halftime. Sam Dekker scored 10 points, making all three of his shots and going 4 for 4 at the free-throw line in the first half.Meet the new Clippers, not the same as the old Clippers.Blake Griffin and Danilo Gallinari sat on the Clippers’ bench, wearing sharp suits and wide smiles on their faces as their teammates rolled past the Sacramento Kings on Tuesday at Staples Center, taking a 122-95 victory over their Pacific Division rivals.The names were different, for sure, but the results were the same. The Clippers’ victory over the Kings was their 17th in their last 21 meetings, and it was sparked in the first half by supporting players whose roles have increased while Griffin, Gallinari and Patrick Beverley have been sidelined by injuries.center_img Austin Rivers, who scored a career-high 38 points in the Clippers’ loss to the Memphis Grizzlies on Saturday, didn’t get his first basket until sinking a 3-pointer with 2 minutes, 23 seconds left in the first half Tuesday. He didn’t need to score. His teammates had his back.“Total team effort,” he said. “It seemed like every role player was a star in their role.”The Clippers broke open the game by outscoring the Kings by 37-14 to end the half with a 71-53 lead. They seemed to be scoring at will while reaching a season high for points in a half, shooting 61 percent (25 of 41), including 50 percent on 3-pointers (10 of 20).By game’s end, Wilson scored 17 points on 5-for-7 shooting, Teodosic had 10 assists to go with eight points and Dekker scored 10 points as the Clippers won for the third time in four games. Montrezl Harrell scored a game-high 22 points for the Clippers (with seven rebounds) in 22 minutes, and Lou Williams added 21 points.Willie Cauley-Smith led the Kings with 17 points.last_img read more


WHS Class of 1973 donate $500 to the ‘Light up Wellington’ project at chamber coffee


first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (5) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -1 Vote up Vote down John Himer · 356 weeks ago Wow that’s great news, it just might be so nice I won’t ever have to visit the Plaza in Kansas City, MO because of our new beautiful lights. Now we just need to upgrade our downtown night life accommodations to make out downtown not only look attractive but be a small town entertainment destination. Report Reply 0 replies · active 356 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Guest · 356 weeks ago Looking forward to seeing the new lights! Our downtown is improving a little at a time. Report Reply 0 replies · active 356 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down charlie · 356 weeks ago Why do you have to be a smart —. So rude to a nice donation. Just go to KC and look all you want dumb —. Report Reply 0 replies · active 356 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down mom2mykids · 356 weeks ago Maybe I missed what the amount that is needed to totally fund this deal? does anyone know? Report Reply 0 replies · active 356 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down mom2mykids · 356 weeks ago I tried looking on the chambers web site but nothing about it on there… Report Reply 0 replies · active 356 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments By Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Thursday at the 10 a.m. Wellington Area Chamber of Commerce Coffee, Sunni Bales, who serves as chairman of the “Light Up Wellington” project, presented a $500 donation on behalf of the Wellington High School class of 1973.The WACC and the City of Wellington have been working together raising funds to purchase and install white LED lights that will line the tops of the buildings in the downtown area.  The lights will be left up year around to illuminate downtown not only during the holidays, but during special events throughout the year.The Wellington Community Foundation has generously offered $3,000.00 in matching funds for donations of $100.00 or more.  With the class of 1973 donation and matching funds from the WCF, the Light Up Wellington project now has approximately $6,800.00.Those pictured from left are: WACC executive director Shelly Hansel-Williams, Wellington City Manager Gus Collins, Bales, and committee member Dana Anderson.last_img read more