Tag: 上海花间坊


Students work to stop AIDS


first_imgThis winter break, several USC students will travel to Africa with a team of 40 people to take part in “Steps over Swaziland.”SOS is a campaign intended to bring relief and awareness to Swaziland, a small country in Africa that has the highest incidence of HIV/AIDS.According to Abhirukt Sapru, a sophomore majoring in business administration who will be taking part in the trip, statistics predict that by the year 2020, the AIDS epidemic could be responsible for the death of Swaziland’s adult population.“A lot of the funds and resources are going to much bigger countries with problems of less magnitude,” Sapru said. “What we hope that SOS will do is draw people’s attention to Swaziland and actually help people understand the real dire problems that are going on there.”One World Futbol Project collaborated with FUNDaFIELD, a non-profit organization co-founded by USC students Garrett Weiss and his brother, Kyle, to organize SOS.The organization fundraises to build soccer fields in impoverished communities. The One World Futbol Project joined FUNDaFIELD to provide highly durable — if not entirely indestructible — soccer balls to complement the fields, Garrett Weiss said.“We’ll be going to about five [community centers] and holding soccer tournaments there, doing clothing exchanges — that kind of thing for the orphanages — as well as giving out AIDS awareness information the entire time and lots of AIDS prevention resources,” said Garrett Weiss, a sophomore majoring in business administration.The USC students on the FUNDaFIELD team will be dribbling one of One World’s soccer balls across Swaziland — a journey that is approximately 130 miles.They will run about 10 to 15 miles each day and deliver the One World soccer balls, jerseys and HIV/AIDS resources at community centers for orphans along the way, Weiss said.FUNDaFIELD plans to construct a field at El Shaddai orphanage, the last stop on their trip.To some, the idea of devoting funds to developing soccer fields and distributing balls might seem to detract resources from solving the severe problems at hand, such as HIV/AIDS, said Tim Jahnigen, inventor of the One World Futbol.However, both FUNDaFIELD and the One World Futbol project acknowledge the significance soccer has on children in poverty, Jahnigen said.“Play and sports reinforce community and conflict resolution and all kinds of things,” Jahnigen said.Jahnigen said he was inspired to create a lasting soccer ball for the One World Futbol Project after watching a documentary about the children in Darfur refugee camps who resorted to playing soccer with balls made of trash. Although many relief efforts have been put in place to help these children, the soccer balls provided don’t last long before they are punctured or otherwise destroyed, he said.“Our vision is to support the work of organizations like FUNDaFIELD,” Jahnigen said. “If you can provide a ball that doesn’t go flat into an environment that is incredibly poor but full of children, it allows the children to play to their hearts’ content instead of until the ball is destroyed.”One World hopes to distribute one million balls to poor communities across the globe within three years, Jahnigen said. So far, around 15,000 balls have been provided through donations and their “buy one, give one” commercial program.“When I had the idea for the ball, it was only meant for children in harsh environments and the idea of making money off of it or making a business out of it was the last thing on my mind. It was just really thinking about children, their needs,” Jahnigen said. “That part of the story has always been the major driving force behind the project.”For SOS, Jahnigen said he hopes to be able to provide between 500 to 1,000 balls for the FUNDaFIELD team to deliver to Swaziland.“We’re all ecstatic, we’re all really looking forward to it,” Sapru said. “We all just can’t wait.”Weiss said he is also enthusiastic for the upcoming SOS trip.“Once you go to Africa, you are able to realize the effects of your work and you’re able to see what else needs to be done,” Weiss said. “When you go, you just get so excited to do more and I’m hoping that’s what comes out of this for everyone else on the trip.”last_img read more


Angels make $1.2 million in payments to ballpark employees


first_img Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield The Angels have issued payments totaling about $1.2 million to more than 1,800 game-day employees who are missing work because of the sport’s COVID-19 shutdown, the team said Sunday.The status of further payments will be determined as events warrant with the season still delayed indefinitely, spokesperson Marie Garvey said.The employees were paid varying amounts based on their hours, job duties and normal rate of pay, Garvey said.The Angels Ballpark Fund includes payments to concession, janitorial and security workers who are employed by outside companies to work at Angel Stadium. Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros “We understand the important contribution that all ballpark workers play in creating a memorable experience at Angel Stadium and have invested over $1 million to provide financial resources during this unprecedented time,” Garvey said in a statement. “Our organization took an inclusive approach and Angels ballpark employees received a one-time distribution this week.”Major League Baseball announced last month that each club would contribute at least $1 million toward paying their game-day employees to compensate them for work lost because of the pandemic.Related Articles Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter center_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more


Women’s World Cup 2019: Argentina frustrates 2011 winner Japan in scoreless tie


first_img Women’s World Cup 2019 preview: What to know when USA takes on Thailand Argentina had lost all six of its previous World Cup games, conceding a whopping 33 goals, but more than held its own against a side that sits 30 places higher in the world rankings.Yui Hasegawa wasted a golden opportunity to seal maximum points in the second half for Japan, which will need to improve dramatically if it is to overcome Scotland in the next group game on Friday. Related News Japan’s World Cup campaign got off to a frustrating start as Argentina held the favored side to a 0-0 draw in Group D on Monday.Asako Takakura’s team has reached the final in the last two editions of the tournament — winning it in 2011 — but a third consecutive appearance looks unlikely if this insipid display in Paris is anything to go by. ¡PUNTAZO!A famous result for @Argentina! #ARGJPN | #FIFAWWC pic.twitter.com/ysvSDgVr45— FIFA Women’s World Cup (@FIFAWWC) June 10, 2019Japan dominated possession in the first half but was largely kept at arm’s length by Argentina’s backline.  The closest chance came after nine minutes when Narumi Miura flashed wide of Vanina Correa’s right-hand post from a promising position. The Argentina goalkeeper cut out Yuika Sugasawa’s back-post header soon after with a number of players poised to pounce inside the 6-yard box.Correa was called into action five minutes after the restart, pawing Kumi Yokoyama’s long-range drive into the path of Sugasawa, who blazed over from an acute angle. Hasegawa then had the clearest chance of the game shortly before the hour mark, skewing horribly wide from 12 yards when it looked easier to score.That miss appeared to deflate Japan, with Argentina breaking out of its own half to cause its opponents some nervous moments in defense.Neither side was able to find a winner in the closing stages, though, with Argentina finishing as the happier team having claimed its first ever World Cup point.last_img read more