Tag: 成都桑拿网


Libya draw away to stay above South Africa and Nigeria


first_img0Shares0000Keagan Dolly (C) of South Africa challenges Libya’s Almoatasembellah Ali Mohamed during the sides’ 0-0 draw © AFP / ANESH DEBIKYJOHANNESBURG, South Africa, Sep 8 – Libya forced a 0-0 draw with South Africa in Durban Saturday to remain surprise Group E leaders in the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations qualifying competition.When the mini-leagues draw was made, former African champions Nigeria and South Africa were installed as favourites to fill the two places available for the finals in Cameroon. But with two of the six qualifying rounds completed, Libya lead with four points, South Africa and Nigeria have three each and the Seychelles are pointless.Algeria-born coach Adel Amrouche said he hoped the goalless stalemate at Moses Mabhida Stadium in the Indian Ocean port city would bring joy to the Libyan people.“Only football can bring the people together,” said the 50-year-old former coach of Equatorial Guinea, Burundi and Kenya.He was talking after deadly clashes in Tripoli last week between rival militias battling for control of the Libyan capital.Libyan national and club teams have had to host home matches outside the north African country because of safety issues since the 2011 death of dictator Muamar Kadhafi.“I am not coaching Libya for money — I want to help bring happiness to the people by taking the national team to the 2019 Cup of Nations finals in Cameroon,” said Amrouche.The match staged in wet conditions before a small crowd followed a predictable pattern with Libya putting virtually their entire team behind the ball whenever threatened.It led to an international that delivered little excitement and the match appeared destined to finish goalless long before the final whistle.“We battled to gain possession against physically strong opponents and then surrendered the ball too easily at times,” admitted England-born South Africa coach Stuart Baxter.Libya face Nigeria twice between October 8 and 16 while South Africa host and visit the Seychelles at the same time.0Shares0000(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more


Photo library: Business and industry 24


first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Business & Industry contact sheet (1.8MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Northern Cape province: The primary crusher structure at the new Kumani Mine, near Kathu.Photo: Graeme WilliamsMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Fruit packing at the Bavaria fruit farm where the lemons, oranges and mangoes packaged are destined mostly for the export market. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Fruit packing at the Bavaria fruit farm where the lemons, oranges and mangoes packaged are destined mostly for the export market. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Fruit packing at the Bavaria fruit farm where the lemons, oranges and mangoes packaged are destined mostly for the export market. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Fruit packing at the Bavaria fruit farm where the lemons, oranges and mangoes packaged are destined mostly for the export market. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Fruit packing at the Bavaria fruit farm where the lemons, oranges and mangoes packaged are destined mostly for the export market. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: Jumbo drill rig working in a development end underground at Mponeng Gold Mine, part of the west Witwatersrand operations of mining multinational Anglo Ashanti’s Western Deep Levels. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Orkney, North West province: The twin shafts – and topside headgear towers – of mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Great Noligwa Gold Mine. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Orkney, North West province: Mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Tau Lekoa Gold Mine, part of the company’s Vaal River operations. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 24: {loadposition business}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more


Demo Africa sheds light on investing in startups


first_img29 August 2016Approaching the right investors and the characteristics of a good or badinvestment were discussed in How to Get Deals Done, one of the knowledgesessions held on the first day of the Demo Africa 2016 conference in Johannesburg.At the two-day event, held at the Sandton Convention Centre on 25 and 26August, entrepreneurs and investors from all over the continent were networkingand sharing insights into the tech industry.The event was hosted by Lions Africa in collaboration with the City ofJohannesburg, the Department of Science and Technology, Google, Intel andMicrosoft.Some of the investors said: “The cheapest investment is to just bring cash.Access to business networks is another way of being part of an investment deal.”PresentationsThe organisers said that this year, 723 tech entrepreneurs from 27 Africancountries applied to be part of Demo Africa. Of these, 30 entrepreneurs werechosen to present their businesses to local and international investors at theconference.The entrepreneurs included Rodney Kuhn of Sortd., a Johannesburg companythat designed an app to help businesspeople organise their lives and work throughtheir emails.Other start-ups at the conference included Art Nigeria, an online company thatsells the work of Nigerian artists globally. This artwork can be in the form of a mug,a throw pillow, a duvet or on a frame.Mum’s Village is an online platform that gives information to pregnant womenin Kenya.Owners of all the startups were given six minutes to pitch their businesses toinvestors and judges on the two days of the conference.The judges then gave their opinions on the presentation and offered advice.Through this, the startups stood a chance to get funding for their businesses.The boot campTwo days before the conference began, 27 tech entrepreneurs took part in aboot camp hosted by Demo Africa. During this, they received coaching andmentoring on how to pitch to investors.“The Demo Africa boot camp is a continuation of an online mentoring andcoaching process we have in place for the finalists,” said Harry Hare, executivedirector of Demo Africa.The online programme ran for four weeks and was concluded with the bootcamp.The process of mentoring and coaching was vital for many of theseentrepreneurs, said Hare. “Our experience has shown us that the Demo Africafinalists are at different development and maturity levels within their businesses.“A lot of them are also technically minded rather than business-minded, so werefine them to think more about their business and what they are offering toinvestors,” he explained.Stephen Ozoigba of the African Technology Foundation was one of the mentorsat the boot camp. He said 30% of the startups in the finalists’ group were led bywomen.He encouraged the attendees to support their local startups, especially thoserun by women. “It’s important that we empower women.” The 27 Demo Africa 2016 finalists were part of a two-day boot camp withmentors. (Image: Demo Africa 2016)Advice on making dealsIn the How to Make Deals session, Ozoigba said designation was importantwhen approaching an investor. “Some cities are more favourable.”He spoke about issues that could cause an investor to stop funding a business.One of these was lack of structure, which could lead to your losing a deal with aninvestor. “It’s good to learn governance early [about how business works]. Comeinto board meetings and learn how things work.“For example, learn about what voting is in a board meeting.” At Demo Africa 2016, Stephen Ozoigba (right) of the African Technology Foundation says everyone should support their local startup. Liew Claasen (left) was also part of the discussion. (Image: Melissa Javan)It was important that owners of startups understood the legal status of theentity, said Tomi Davies of the African Business Angels Network. “Before making adeal with an investor, decide who will get the money that you will make.”Their process as investors was simple, said Liew Claasen of Newtown Partner.“You first send out the application to us. We then meet face to face if we think wewant to invest into your business. It helps us to make consistent decisions.”Mistakes some entrepreneurs made were that they did not communicate muchwith the investor after they got the capital, he said. “Post-deal communicate a loteven if you feel this person is too important and busy.“A bad investment is when [the startup] doesn’t give updates [to the investor].We must have a good relationship. Your relationship with your investor will alsosend out a message to the next investor about you.” A panel at Demo Africa in Johannesburg on 25 and 26 August 2016 on How DealsAre Done gives advice to entrepreneurs on dealing with investment partners.(Image: Melissa Javan)Other knowledge sessions included Venture Growth Strategy.Insightful eventEntrepreneurs such as Innocentia Msimango said the conference was an eye-opener for her. She is the owner of a food distribution company called Cyber MobiRoyal Kitchen. Her staff cooks food for clients, which the company then delivers.Msimango said she did not have an idea about what investors sought. “Thisinformation gives me hope.“Not only will I get capital, but heartfelt support of experience. I find itencouraging that there are people wanting to help us.”The conference gave quite refreshing insights, said Donovan Nadison of theBusiness Place Network. “The information here is about how to deal with andmanage complex small businesses support issues.“It confirms to me that South Africa is on the right track. We have expertise indealing with SMME issues that are complex… Everyone can benefit from thenetworking done here.”There were 500 attendees at the conference. The Global EntrepreneurshipCongress will be held in March 2017 in Johannesburg. One of the objectives of thisconference is to brand the City of Gold, as Joburg is known, and the whole of Africaas an investment destination.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website?See Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more


‘If Muslims of India succeed, the country will succeed’


first_img“If 200 million Muslims of India succeed, India will succeed. So rather than getting filled with bigotry and hatred, we should try to bring people together and provide them an equal economic opportunity,” said Frank Islam, noted Indo-American entrepreneur and philanthropist.Speaking to The Hindu ahead of participating in the 202nd Sir Syed Day event at AMU as the chief guest on Thursday, the celebrated alumnus of the university said: “One nation under God is acceptable but not one nation under one religion and one language. That is not part of the secular ethos of the country. When you attack one set of people because of who they are, you attack the composite culture of India.” He said India was a “global beacon” for democracy and “we have to keep that momentum alive”.The head of FI Investment Group said he was not an expert on Islam but Islamic faith always had people who were entrepreneurs. “I am here to provide a connection between AMU and entrepreneurship. The students should go out and get jobs, create jobs and make a cha-nge in people’s lives. That’s what Sir Syed’s vision was.”He appealed to the Muslim youth to keep their chin high, aim high and work hard. “If you are good at something, people recognise your talent and give you opportunities. Don’t be afraid of hostility or get disheartened by prejudices; it probably happens in every country… There are Muslims who can’t afford good education. It is where people like me have a role to play,” said Mr. Islam who has funded the construction of an auditorium in the mass communication department and an entrepreneurship centre in the department of business administration in AMU.Modern educationOn the need for imparting modern education, Mr Islam said madrasas have to rework their curriculum to train youngsters for the 21st-century workforce. “I have always said reciting Koran is a very good thing, and one should do that, but it is not going to get you a job.”Aked about Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s recent visit to the U.S., Mr. Islam said he was able to capture the pulse of the Indian-American population. He added that there were protesters wherever Mr. Modi went but their number was much less than those who turned up to cheer for him.last_img read more


Navios Maritime Partners Entrusts Rickmers Fleet to Affiliate


first_imgzoom Greek shipowner Navios Maritime Partners plans to transfer the 14-vessel container fleet acquired from Rickmers Maritime to its affiliate Navios Maritime Containers Inc. The company expects to carry out the transfer at a cost of USD 5 million and an investment of USD 30 million in return for equity.As disclosed, Navios Partners will also receive a warrant, with a five-year term, exercisable for an additional 6.8% equity interest in NMCI.In line with the terms of the deal, Navios Maritime Holdings is also expected to invest USD 5 million in exchange for equity, and receive a warrant, with a five-year term, exercisable for an additional 1.7% equity interest in NMCI.The vessels from the fleet are to kick off delivery starting the week of May 15, 2017, and the first to be handed over are five 4,250 TEU vessels, as informed earlier.These vessels are employed on charters that have staggered expirations in 2018 and early 2019 at a net daily charter rate of USD 26,850.The acquisition is still subject to a number of conditions, and “no assurance can be provided that the acquisition will close at all or in part,” the company added.In April, Navios Maritime Partners revealed its plans to acquire the entire container fleet consisting of fourteen ships from Rickmers Maritime for about USD 113 million. The move came in the aftermath of the decision of Rickmers Trust Management, the trustee-manager of Rickmers Maritime, to wound up its business.The average age of the fleet, which consists of eleven 4,250 TEU containerships and three 3,450 TEU vessels, is 9.5 years.Navios Partners is financing the purchase through a USD 20 million equity investment by Navios Partners and a secured loan facility under discussion.last_img read more


Manitoba Tories show some support for Liberal bill banning weight discrimination


first_imgWINNIPEG – A move to ban discrimination based on weight and size under Manitoba’s human rights code has moved a step closer to becoming law, although the Progressive Conservative government has not yet committed to passing it.Liberal legislature member Jon Gerrard has tried three times to get support for a private member’s bill that would add weight and size as grounds for human rights protection. He didn’t get any support for his previous two attempts, but the Tories have now voted in favour of sending Gerrard’s bill to a legislature committee for public hearings Wednesday night.“There’s no guarantee it will pass all the way, but we believe we’ve got some really good presenters at committee stage and we’re hopeful,” Gerrard said Tuesday.Justice Minister Cliff Cullen would not make any promises beyond listening to what people have to say.“We will reserve comment until we’ve had the opportunity to listen to Manitobans at committee,” Cullen said in a brief written statement.“We look forward to discussing ways to better ensure that all Manitobans are treated fairly and equitably.”Gerrard has long said overweight people need protection because many have been bullied, shamed, passed over for promotions or denied health-care services.The bill also proposes protection for people with dwarfism.Lindsey Mazur, a dietician and spokesperson for Manitobans Against Weight Stigma, said the proposed law is needed.“Certainly I have heard about promotions and jobs being denied based on size,” Mazur said. “This affects so many areas of society, all the way to our children and bullying.”Some people have been told they will not receive medical services unless they first lose weight, she added.Manitoba’s human rights code bans discrimination on several grounds including age, gender, religion, sexual orientation and disability.Across Canada, there have been human rights commission rulings in favour of obese persons, but they have been limited to people considered disabled because of their obesity.In 2010, the Quebec Human Rights Commission ruled a morbidly obese woman was discriminated against by her condominium association when she was denied a handicapped parking spot.Gerrard said people should not have to be obese to the point of being disabled before they can be protected from discrimination.last_img read more


Celebrities Attend UNICEF UK Halloween Ball


first_imgLong-standing UNICEF UK Ambassador Jemima Khan joined guests Suki Waterhouse, Tinie Tempah, Hugh Grant, Guy Ritchie, Naughty Boy and Emeli Sande at Unicef UK’s star–studded Halloween Ball on Thursday, raising vital funds to help protect Syria’s children from danger.The event raised an incredible £750,000, made possible by generous donations from guests and the UK Government matching all public donations on the night pound for pound.High-profile personalities from the worlds of entertainment, fashion and business turned out at London’s iconic venue, One Mayfair, to support Unicef’s work to help the millions of children in Syria and the surrounding regions that are in danger from disease, malnutrition and violence.Canadian rock legend Bryan Adams opened the evening’s entertainment with his classic hit Run to You, followed by a surprise duet of When You’re Gone with British model and actress Suki Waterhouse. Tinie Tempah closed the show with an electrifying set including Pass Out and Written in the Stars. Guests made their way down The Rabbit Hole to an after party in the venue’s Crypt and a set by DJ Seth Troxler until the early hours of the morning.Unicef UK Ambassador and host of the Halloween Ball, Jemima Khan said, “The number of Syrian children in danger is spiralling out of control. For more than three years, children have borne the brunt of indiscriminate violence. I recently visited Jordan with Unicef to meet Syrian children and families who have fled the conflict. Unicef is working day and night to reach these children with life-saving food, water, medicine, education and support to help them deal with the trauma they have faced. Their work is desperately underfunded. Tonight at the Halloween Ball we hope to raise a huge amount to help give Syrian children their childhood back.”The money raised at the Halloween Ball will help Unicef, the world’s leading children’s organisation, provide children in Syria and refugee children in five neighbouring countries – Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt – with vital aid and support, as part of the largest humanitarian operation in history. The £750,000 raised will be added to the £4.4 million already raised for Syrian children by Unicef UK in 2014 and the emergency appeal will continue until the end of January.Over the next three months the UK Government will match pound for pound all public donations made to Unicef’s work for the children of Syria.International Development Secretary, Justine Greening said, “Nearly four years of fighting have taken a grim toll on the people of Syria and its neighbours. Inevitably, vulnerable children pay the highest price. That is why, for the second year in a row, we will match pound for pound all public donations to Unicef UK’s valuable winter appeal for the children of Syria, helping the generosity of the British public go twice as far. This means children caught up in this conflict receive urgent lifesaving help along with the education and support they need to build a better future for themselves and their country.”Unicef UK Executive Director, David Bull said: “Millions of children in Syria and the surrounding region are in danger. They face losing their homes, their families, even their lives. Unicef is one of the few organisations working inside Syria as well as delivering humanitarian aid across the region. We are so grateful for the overwhelming support and generosity that our guests have shown this evening and to the UK Government for matching pound for pound all donations made tonight and for the next three months. We rely entirely on voluntary donations so the money raised is vital to enable Unicef to continue our life-saving work for Syrian children.”You can help keep Syria’s children safe too. To find out more about Unicef’s work to protect children in danger or to donate, please visit unicef.org.uk/Syria.last_img read more


Petition tries to push NWT government to reopen Elders residence


first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN NewsSharon Lafferty watched both of her elderly parents leave their home to access medical support services.Neither wanted to go, but with the closure of the Elder’s facility in Denı́nu Kų́ę́ – Fort Resolution, Northwest Territories, remaining in the isolated community became unmanageable.“I think if we cared for them in our community they would not get lonesome. They would have more of their traditional foods, visitors, support from their own caregivers as oppose to having to meet everyone and make new friends,” Lafferty said.When Lafferty’s mother suffered a stroke she was medevaced to Stanton Territorial Hospital in Yellowknife, where she received care for over a year.Her husband was left behind.“At that age separating her from my Dad affected his health. He was a diabetic and he stopped caring for his health. He was so lonesome caring for my mum,” Lafferty said.Her 87-year-old father also moved to the next community over in Hay River, but it wasn’t smooth sailing.“When he was at medical appointments, they (health practitioners) were wondering why he wasn’t talking. He has to have a boogie board where he writes things down to talk to him and then he will verbally talk back, but they didn’t know he was deaf.“There was no communication between facilities,” she said.The Elder’s Facility closed a decade ago due to funding cuts from the Territorial government.It sits partially occupied by government offices.Across the road, Mavis Klause, Sharon’s cousin packs up her house.Medical travel has become unbearable for the 71-year-old.“I have never seen the same doctor twice in five years. You don’t go see a doctor because you want to. The nurse will tell you when to see the doctor,” Klause said.(Sharon Lafferty, middle, sitting with her cousins. On the right is Mavis Klause)She said she has waited over two years to see a foot specialist for her diabetes.More accessible healthcare was not the only reason in her decision to move.Klause also cited fear of crime as another motivator and said that her doors must be locked because of a nearby bootlegger.Two doors down Howard Beaulieu has a similar story.Lafferty introduced us to him and acted as an interpreter.Beaulieu lives alone and has limited mobility after suffering a stroke some years ago.“When Howard wanted to raise his concerns over the crime around his house. I went over and told the personal support workers. I was told he would have to call housing and then they would have to call the RCMP.,” Lafferty said.Howard expressed his frustration over having to contact different agencies over the phone with his limited speech.“If something were to happen how could he communicate this to the RCMP going through a Yellowknife detachment and them not being able to understand his English because of his paralysis. You have to know him for a while to understand his English,” Lafferty said.In the old Elder’s facility residents were able to press a button to access either a secretary or security.When Beaulieu hit his head two weeks ago, he said there was no one to call over the weekend.“Ten days later he says his head is still sore. I am wondering when they brought him to the nursing station, did the nurse tell his personal support worker to follow up if he had soreness or dizziness,” Lafferty said.In the fall of 2018, a petition prompted by the Band Office circulated in the community.It called on the NWT Health Minister to reopen the Elder’s Facility and received over 100 signatures.The local MLA read the petition in the Legislative Assembly, but there has been no public discussion since.APTN News, contacted the NWT’s Health and Social Services Authority but were unable to receive an interview in time for this article.Lafferty, Klause and Bealieu all signed the petition, but whether or not any of them will live in the community long enough to see a positive change remains unknown.cmorrittjacobs@aptn.ca@aptncharlottelast_img read more