Tag: 换7的论坛或者贴吧


Airbnb and 23andMe are teaming up to popularize genealogical travel


first_imgWhether it’s another neighborhood within the city you’re from or a trip to a distant land, connecting with your roots can be an enriching experience, and with the help of Airbnb and 23andMe, you can now plan a trip as unique as your DNA. The rise in popularity of genealogical travel is also prevalent on Airbnb. Since 2014, the number of passengers using Airbnb to track their roots has increased by 500 percent. This type of travel is most often chosen by users between the ages of 60 and 90. The most popular destinations for genealogical travel are places known for their immigration history such as the US, Canada, Australia, China, the United Kingdom, France, Korea, New Zealand, Taiwan and Brazil. Learning about origins is a key reason why people opt for genetic testing like the ones offered by 23andMe. As many as 53 percent of users said they opted for the test because they want to learn more about their ancestors and the origins of their family. The rise of genealogical travel “At Airbnb, we believe that authentic travel experiences help connect with local culture and create a sense of belonging wherever you are in the world. And is there a better way to do that than traveling to the destination you come from? We are proud to announce that we have partnered with 23andMe to make it easier for travelers to plan trips that are as unique as their DNA.Said Joe Gebbia, director and co-founder of Airbnb. “Collaborating with Airbnb provides our clients with an exciting opportunity to connect with their ancestors through deeply personal cultural and tourist experiences”, Said Anne Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of 23andMe. With the rise of home genetic testing and analytics, such as that offered by the 23andMe platform, it has never been easier to learn about one’s origins, which in turn has contributed to the growing trend of so-called “genealogical travel”. People around the world travel to connect with their ancestors, which is why Airbnb and 23andMe team up to make it easier to organize this type of travel. Both companies will integrate genealogical travel into their services. When a user receives a report of their origin on the 23andMe platform, they will have the opportunity to search through Airbnb for private accommodations and experiences in their ancestral countries. For example, if the user of the 23andMe service is originally from southern Italy, he can look for private accommodation in Apulia and explore his ancestors in more detail from there. Or someone with Mexican roots can find experience in Ciudad de México to learn ancient techniques of using natural colors that are part of his heritage. Also, special genealogy planning pages are now in Airbnb’s range of services. It is this curiosity about the origin that has contributed to the rise in popularity of genealogical journeys around the world. According to a study from April 2019, commissioned by Airbnb, as many as 89 percent of Indians traveled to at least one country where they have roots, just like 69 percent of French and more than half of Americans.last_img read more


Groy set to step in for injured Konz


first_imgCenter Peter Konz (66) has been constantly peppering Ryan Groy, a utility man of sorts for the Badger offense, with questions regarding the Illini’s defense all week in preparation.[/media-credit]The first time Ryan Groy stepped into a starting role on Wisconsin’s starting offensive line, he might have had an excuse for a mistake.This time, with starting center Peter Konz sidelined two to four weeks with a dislocated ankle? There’s little margin for error.Wisconsin, now ranked No. 17 in the BCS, controls its postseason destiny after the losses by Ohio State and Penn State this past weekend. Should the Badgers win out, they’ll represent the Big Ten Leaders division in the conference’s inaugural championship game Dec. 3. After that, a BCS bowl berth is beyond feasible.Konz suffered his injury in Saturday’s 42-13 win at Minnesota when running back Montee Ball was tackled into Konz’ left leg as the 6-foot-5, 315-pound junior center was making a block on the edge. Konz immediately crumpled to the ground, and after several minutes without much movement, was carted off the field. Fortunately for the Badgers, x-rays found no surgical damage anywhere in Konz’ ankle.So with a road game at Illinois looming Saturday and the season finale at home against Penn State the week after, Groy slides into a role he’s well accustomed to. Earlier this season, Groy filled in for left guard Travis Frederick when he sprained his MCL in Wisconsin’s season-opener against Nevada-Las Vegas. That was after spending the majority of last season as a fullback where he started two games, with some spot duty along the offensive line mixed in.“It’s hard, but it’s also very, very beneficial,” Frederick said, who’s bounced between guard and center himself. “When you have a position like that where you know three [different] positions, that’s just more that you know about the game in general. You see a look, you can see it from a center standpoint and you can see it from a guard standpoint. Even from [Groy’s] standpoint, you can see it from a fullback standpoint. You know where people are going and the way the things move better as a whole.”At 6-foot-5, 320 pounds, Groy’s figure bellows “center.” But as evidenced by his experience as a fullback, the Middleton native boasts stunning mobility for one of the biggest linemen on one of the nation’s biggest offensive lines.When he was thrust into the forefront of the offense following Frederick’s injury, both Konz and left tackle Ricky Wagner, unprovoked, labeled him the team’s quickest offensive lineman.“I’ve seen a huge change between last year and this year in just his ability to understand the defenses,” Konz said of Groy, with clear emphasis on “huge.” “It’s one thing to memorize plays, but it’s another to change those plays in the middle of the game or practice. That’s something he’s going to be able to do.”Indeed, when Groy suited up for his first start along the offensive line in Week 2 against Oregon State, the Badgers missed nary a step in a 35-0 shutout that saw UW gain 397 yards of total offense, 208 of which came on the ground. The offensive line cleared gaping holes for Wisconsin’s running backs, who together averaged 5.1 yards per carry.Saturday against the Illini, however, Groy will be charged with proving he’s more than an athletically gifted big man – he’ll need to set Wisconsin’s offense against Illinois’ 12th-ranked scoring defense.“Right now, I’ve been a center for the last couple of weeks,” Groy said. “I’ve been in this position; instead of going in and having to know three positions, I’m going in knowing I’m just center. I’m just preparing for that.”Lying behind Konz on Wisconsin’s depth chart for most of the season, Groy has witnessed a lineman widely perceived to be one of the nation’s best centers. Konz is on the watch list for the Rimington Trophy, given annually to the nation’s top center, and he very well could be a high NFL draft pick if he chooses to leave UW after this season.“He’s just very aware of the game and the defense he’s going against,” Groy said of Konz. “He’s a really athletic guy, and his knowledge of the game is really something that I admire and I’d like to follow.”The first step in doing so comes in this week’s preparation, as Groy said that Konz, Frederick and several other linemen have put in extra film sessions to prepare for Illinois. Konz admitted to peppering Groy relentlessly over how to handle whatever Illinois might throw at him, from run blocking to zone schemes and safety blitzes. When Groy didn’t hesitate on any answers, Konz knew he had found the key to prepping his substitute.“The biggest thing was comfort. At this point, for me, there’s telling him every single in and out of what I’ve learned. It’s not going to sink in, and I know that. You’ve really got to go through some experiences, you’ve go to go through some losses and personal hard times in the game, on the field, to be able to pick up some of these,” he said. “But as far as him feeling comfortable – because I know he can play as good as anybody in the Big Ten if he’s feeling comfortable – just him knowing it in his own mind is the key to this week.”last_img read more