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ELWA Hospital Discharges ‘Hostage’ Baby Mother


first_imgPatricia Maculey in an interview after she was discharged from the hospital.Patricia Macauley told the Daily Observer that following successful treatment, she could not be released immediately, because she could not afford the amount requested for her treatment. According to her, the brother who promised to pay the bill went out of town to look for money.“He went on the hustle and promised to come soon if he had some of the money, because the amount was too much for me,” she stated.Patricia is a petty trader and resides in Chicken Soup Factory Community. She is a mother of three. In tears, she expressed deep frustration and regretted the way in which she was treated by her fiancé, who has been identified as one Eman. “The guy who impregnated me said he never wanted it and said that I should abort it, which I refused to do. And so he left me,” she said.She however expressed thanks and appreciation to Mr. Obiamiwe, including other humanitarians who rallied around to get her out of the hospital.Arthur Taylor from the business and finance department at ELWA Hospital, in conversation with Mr. Obiamiwe, said that at no time has ELWA hospital kept any patient who, as in the case of Patricia, did not have money to pay his/her bill.“Patients who are not able to pay their bills here, we discharge them free of charge, because it is against our ethics as professional health personnel to keep patients hostage,” he stated.According to him, when Patricia successfully completed her treatment, she was asked to fill in a form with names and contact numbers that included her brother’s, after Patricia had promised to pay the bill.He claimed that since the names and contacts were given to them, they have tried to call anyone related to Patricia but to no avail, something which, he said, they have experienced from many patients. He said when patients are admitted, forms are filled in for further reference in case of anything, “but some patients deliberately give us numbers that don’t exist.”He maintained that ELWA, as a renowned health center in Liberia, understands the rules and regulations involved in dealing with patients, “regardless of who they are, rich or poor.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) (L-R) Martha F. Korpu, patient’s advocate ELWA hospital, Patricia Maculey & Mr. Emeka Obiamiwe Patricia Macauley, a patient who was held hostage at the ELWA Hospital after she had undergone successful treatment, was over the weekend discharged, following an appeal from Mr. Emeka Obiamiwe, Chief Executive Officer of NUBIAN radio in Monrovia.Patricia was billed the amount of L$68,000, which she could not make available, and had acquiesced to the ELWA Hospital’s alleged insistence to have her remain on its premises until said cost could be paid.According to reports from the hospital, Patricia, who was admitted on August 3, was treated and temporarily  discharged a few weeks later when she gave birth.Patricia and the young baby were finally released on September 7, after the CEO of Nubian FM made an appeal to the hospital.Obiamiwe presented an check for the initial amount L$30,000 to one of the hospital administrators, Martha F. Korpu, a patient advocate, and Arthur Taylor.The presentation was made possible through the kind courtesy of a group called GLS-NAS as well as other philanthropists, including Mrs. Sara Beysolow Nyanti of UNHCR-Jordan, Pia Brown and Samia Adanne Adighibe of the United States of America and Ada Reeves-Clarke.During the presentation, Obiamiwe explained his experience with Patricia. “My lady had just had our first baby girl when I came in contact with Patricia. I decided to help her out as she needed help and thought of her as a sister or her child who could have been mine.”In the wake of these prevailing conditions, Obiamiwe said plans are currently underway to reach out to friends and associates in the Diaspora and items will be collected to help women and children trapped in such circumstances . “I’m going to use my radio station and upcoming events to create awareness as well as raise funds to free many other girls or women like Patricia,” he noted.last_img read more


Open Source Is Old School, Says The GitHub Generation


first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Tags:#apache#GitHub#GPL#licensing#Open Source#Software Freedom Law Center Related Posts Not content to stop there, however, we seem to be entering a new phase: the no-license model. As free-software advocate Glyn Moody notes, “the logical conclusion of the move to more ‘permissive’ licences [is] one that permits everything.”While Moody talks about public domain software, the GitHub generation seems to be less fussy about legal mechanics.The GitHub License Black HoleAs Aaron Williamson, senior staff counsel with the Software Freedom Law Center, presented at this year’s Linux Collaboration Summit, the vast majority of projects on GitHub don’t appear to carry any license terms at all. (The Register‘s Neil McAllister offers a great summary.) GitHub has become the gathering point for modern open-source development, so it’s hugely significant that a mere 14.9% (219,326) of the 1,692,135 code repositories Williamson scanned had a file in their top-level directories that specified a license. In other words, the vast majority of code on GitHub isn’t necessarily open source. Or proprietary software. Or, well, anything. It’s just code.Redmonk analyst James Governor nailed this trend in 2012, arguing that “younger devs today are about POSS – Post open source software.” For such developers, Governor holds, licensing and governance are an afterthought: the code is all. Both Gartner and Forrester find that open source is booming precisely because developers want flexibility.Less licensing = more flexibility.Is Licensing Necessary?Not that this approach is unproblematic. Outercurve Foundation board member Stephen Walli posits that such “promiscuous” sharing without governance and licensing will lead to “software transmitted diseases.” But it’s unclear that the GitHub generation cares. Maybe they will. Maybe they’ll wake up and smell the need for licensing. Or maybe the project/company they create will attract the interest of a would-be buyer, and suddenly source code hygeine will matter. A lot. As a Black Duck study shows, open-source compliance is becoming an increasingly common question in mergers and acquisitions: But all is not lost. Berkholz analyzed a wide array of projects to determine the interplay between project size and licensing. As he summarizes, “as projects grow, they tend to sort out any licensing issues, likely because they get corporate users, professional developers, etc.”License rebels, in other words, tend to become less rebellious as their projects mature.Ultimately, then, we almost certainly don’t face an industry meltdown stemming from uncertain code provenance. Instead, we have a highly permissive license culture that helps to foster the development of code in the early phases of open-source development, which graduates to Apache-style licensing as projects catch on. Lawyers can rest easy.Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock.center_img For years, the software industry has been trending away from so-called ‘copyleft’ licenses like the GNU General Public License (GPL) and toward permissive, Apache-style licensing. Given the rising importance of developers, this isn’t surprising: developers just want to get work done without being bogged down by license requirements. It’s perhaps not surprising, therefore, that permissive Apache licensing may simply be a way station on the road to no licensing at all.That’s what GitHub seems to be telling us, anyway.A Trend Toward Extreme PermissivenessEarly in the life of free and open-source software, copyleft licensing reigned supreme. But for years, permissive licenses like BSD and MIT have been climbing, as Redmonk analyst Donnie Berkholz nicely pictures: Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Matt Asay Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more


Tips for Handing Off a Project to Another Video Editor


first_img2. Label Your Sequences With IntentI’ve been asked before to go back and make small revisions to projects several months old that I had never touched before. On several of those, the sequences were named things like:Rough v1Rough_v1 CopyRough_v1 Copy CopyFinal_v2Untitled Sequence Copy 02 v3Edit v2 FinalRough Edit v2 Final RevisedYou get the picture. I actually started working on the wrong sequence because of this, which wasted time there, and even more time after I figured that out while I was trying to find the correct one! If you saw all of these in a project, would you have any clue where to start?Save the next editor a huge headache by having a consistent naming convention for your sequences, and stick to it. Here’s how I version:Title the sequence with a name that means something instead of just “edit” or “rough”, for example: “2014 New Products Showcase”.Numbers increment with client revisionsLetters are for internal revisionsExample: The rough edit would be “2014 New Products Showcase v1”. If I went through two more refinements that I wanted to keep separate before we sent it to the client, they would be called “2014 New Products Showcase v1a” and “2014 New Products Showcase v1b”. When the client sent back revisions and feedback, the next version would be called “2014 New Products Showcase v2”. Further internal revisions would be “2014 New Products Showcase v2a”, etc.Naming is a huge help in identifying the most current version. Want to make it even easier for the next editor and not only keep them from cursing you, but have them sing your praises? Put all old versions in an “Archive” bin, and have only the most current version visible by default. They’ll love you, I promise.3. Keep Your Sequences CleanI don’t think I’ll ever understand why some editor’s timelines seem to use tracks at random and have over 15 of them, but if you have to edit that way, go for it. Just do us other editors a favor: before you walk away from the project make a new version (a “v2a” or whatever, if you follow my suggestions above) and collapse the tracks to something that makes sense. Having one track is great. Want to keep b-roll and your storyline separate? Great. Use two tracks. Not ten. If you use multiple tracks, be consistent with what you put on them, so an editor picking up the project quickly see the pattern and identify what’s where. My usual pattern when I use multiple tracks is:V5: Animated video transitionsV4: Titles and graphicsV3: Adjustment Layers for color if needed.V2: B-RollV1: Primary StorylineIf I can combine any of those in a way that makes sense and without conflict (ex: putting titles, graphics, and transitions on one track), then I do. If you were handed a project like that, I don’t think it’d take very long for you to find what you needed.Also, if prepping a project for another editor to take over, delete the extra junk at the end of the sequence. Sometimes we miss it and the project ends up exporting with 15 extra minutes of black. Most of the time it’s just annoying because it throws off our “scale timeline to window” shortcut (Shift+Z or whatever you use).If you use that as scratch for your selects, that’s great, but do one of two things before passing it off: Either version the sequence so you have it in a previous version so it’s out of the next guy’s way, or cut and paste it into a selects or scratch sequence. The latter is a usually a better option, because the sequence would be clearly labeled if the next editor wants to find good clips to pull from or see some of your other ideas.One last little side note for those of you that end up taking over a project another editor started for you: If he/she took the time to keep things neat for you, you should definitely respect that effort by keeping things organized in the way that editor prefers.I hope this has been helpful, and hopefully it makes your working relationship with other editors a little less stressed. Let me know if you guys think of any other suggestions (share in the comments below)! When working in a collaborative environment, following these tips will keep fellow editors and other post-production specialists from cursing your name when they have to work on your project!As editors, we often pass projects off to other post-production specialists and even other editors. At my work, for example, I might start a project because I have time, but a higher priority project that fits my skill set better might come along, so I’l pass the project I was working on to another editor at my company. We also often have one person do the rough edit, and another person take the project to polish it up.Here are a few tips for preparing your project so that the transition from one editor to the next is as smooth as possible.1. Keep Your Project OrganizedI’ve talked before about the need to keep a project organized, and even passed along some suggestions on how to do so (be sure to check out this post on a bin organization structure for your video editing projects).So, here’s the big question: If you had to hand a project off to another editor mid-project (family emergency, vacation, sick day, called in on a larger project, etc.), could they immediately find all of the pieces they need without having to scour and search every bin and file? Do you put all of the footage in a logical place and make it easy to find B-Roll, identify the most current version of the edit, and determine what graphics have been created and which ones still need designing?If the answer is “no” you’re wasting their time by making things harder than it should be. Good project organization significantly reduces the amount of time spent looking for things (or spent using the wrong things). From a self-benefit perspective, it also keeps them from having to track you down and ask you a bunch of questions, so you save time as well. Keeping things neat and tidy will keep other editors from hating having to pick up a project you started.last_img read more