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Update Strike at Damens Galati Shipyard Over


first_imgzoom The workers’ strike at Damen’s Galati shipyard in Romania has ended, it has been confirmed to World Maritime News by a Damen spokesperson.The strike was staged on August 29, when a number of workers held a spontaneous demonstration in front of the company’s headquarters. The workers were dissatisfied with their wages and were reportedly asking for a pay increase.The protest resulted in a work stoppage at the yard for almost three days.The strike was ended on Thursday, August 31, and work operations are said to have been resumed.Local media informed that the strike was concluded as the company’s management agreed to the proposed wage increase terms.Talks between the company and the union are set to continue until September 15 when a final deal is expected.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more


Should The NBA Move The 3Point Line Back


More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (March 1, 2016), we look at why basketball’s old-timers have come out against the Golden State Warriors and Stephen Curry, we ask whether Mark Cuban is right that the NBA should look into moving the 3-point line back, and we wonder if the Pittsburgh Pirates’ Gerrit Cole deserves a higher salary. Plus, a significant digit on how 3-point fever is taking over high school basketball.Stream the episode by clicking the play button above, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to. Links to what we discussed are here:Ian Levy breaks down just how good Curry’s season has been.On Bill Simmons’s podcast, Kirk Goldsberry advocates for a unique solution to basketball’s supposed 3-point problem.ESPN’s J.A. Adande says Oscar Robertson will never understand Curry.Rob Arthur explains why baseball’s best players are only getting younger.Maybe baseball needs a safety net for younger players, says Fangraphs’ Dave Cameron.Significant Digit: 39. That’s the percentage increase in 3-point attempts between the high-school 3-point attempt leader in 2004-05 and the leader in 2015-16.Here is a video of that leader, Ashtyn “Syrup” Bradley, shooting bombs for his high school team. His true shooting percentage this season is 57.4 percent. Embed Code If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. Hot Takedown read more


Stolen car on fire in Bonita neighborhood


first_img KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A car fire in the Lynwood Hills neighborhood in Bonita prompted first responders to the scene shortly after noon near the corner of Lynwood Drive and Lynnwood Lane.  According to the Deputy Sheriff, the car was reported stolen and no driver could be found at the scene.Story updated at 10:18 p.m. Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitter Posted: August 24, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, center_img Updated: 10:19 PM August 24, 2019 Stolen car on fire in Bonita neighborhoodlast_img read more


US News World Report Becomes Latest Mag on Kindle


first_imgU.S. News & World Report has become the latest magazine to be distributed on the Amazon Kindle.The title joins 15 other titles available on the digital reader, including Newsweek, Time, the Atlantic and Slate.The news comes a week after the title announced its plans to shift from a weekly to bi-weekly frequency starting in 2009. U.S. News’ ad pages fell about 37.5 percent and ad revenue dropped 34.8 percent during the first quarter, according to Publishers Information Bureau figures.last_img


Concord Reuse Project Suffers New Setback


first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The city of Concord for the second time in two weeks has postponed a meeting of the city council to discuss the selection of a master developer for the former Concord Naval Weapons Station in northern California, after the apparent suicide of the city attorney who had been investigating allegations that one of the two competing firms improperly lobbied the city.The city first postponed the council’s discussion late last month after Catellus Development Corp. requested the city investigate its accusations that Lennar Urban had violated the negotiating agreement both finalists had signed. Catellus also asked why city staff failed to recommend a preferred master developer as expected.At the time of his death last week, city attorney Mark Coon was preparing a report on his investigation. It is not clear if Coon finished the report or when the city plans to release his findings, reported the Contra Costa Times.While the city council’s five council members have said Lennar did not lobby them, Concord Mayor Tim Grayson last month returned $12,600 in donations to his state Assembly campaign from companies or individuals linked to Lennar. Kofi Bonner, president of Lennar Urban, vigorously defended his firm’s conduct after Catellus’ accusations came out.The city council had been scheduled to meet Oct. 15 to discuss the selection of a master developer; the city has not yet rescheduled that meeting.The reuse plan for the 5,046-acre weapons station site calls for residential, commercial and office use clustered around the North Concord BART station with greenways and parks separating neighborhood villages. Almost 70 percent of the property would be open space and recreational facilities.————Image Sourcelast_img read more


More Americans quitting jobs as labour market strengthens


first_imgUS job openings surged in December and the number of Americans voluntarily quitting work hit a nine-year high, pointing to labour market strength despite a slowdown in economic growth.The signs of a robust jobs market could ease concerns about the health of the economy, which were underscored by other reports on Tuesday showing a drop in small business confidence in January to a two-year low and further declines in wholesale inventories.”If the labour market is tightening, can the economy really be faltering?” said Joel Naroff, chief economist at Naroff Economic Advisors in Holland, Pennsylvania.Job openings, a measure of labour demand, increased 2,61,000 to a seasonally adjusted 5.61 million in December, the Labour Department said in its monthly Job Openings and Labour Turnover Survey (JOLTS). It was the second highest reading since the series started in 2001.The so-called JOLTS report is among the data watched by Federal Reserve officials to get a pulse on both the labour market and inflation.The increase lifted the jobs openings rate to 3.8 percent from 3.6 percent in November. The hiring rate was unchanged at 3.7 percent, indicating that employers were having trouble finding qualified workers for vacant positions.A total of 3.1 million Americans quit their jobs in December, the highest number since December 2006. That pushed the quits rate, which the Fed looks at as a measure of confidence in the jobs market, to 2.1 percent — the highest level since April 2008.The dollar pared losses against the yen after the data, while US stocks briefly reversed losses. Prices of long-dated US Treasuries were trading higher.The report came ahead of Fed Chair Janet Yellen’s testimony to Congress on Wednesday. A raft of weak economic reports, plummeting oil prices and a stock market sell-off have raised doubts as to whether the US central bank will hike interest rates this year.The Fed raised its overnight benchmark interest rate in December, its first hike in nearly a decade. The economy, however, has been undermined by a strong dollar, sluggish global demand and an effort by businesses to sell off inventory.Ongoing capital spending cuts by energy firms also are weighing on growth.SLACK BEING REDUCED”Skeptics may argue that these (JOLTS) numbers are backward looking, and that spillovers from tighter financial conditions or the energy slump will curb labour market dynamics in the months to come,” said Harm Bandholz, chief US economist at UniCredit Research in New York.”This is certainly a risk and one important reason why the Fed is currently sitting back and waiting. But why should this happen now when it hasn’t over the past several months? After all, oil prices started to fall in mid-2014, and most of the adjustment occurred in the first half of 2015.”The number of unemployed job seekers per open job, a measure of labour market slack, fell to 1.4 in December, the lowest level since March 2007 and down from 1.5 in November.”Diminishing labour market slack has led to a modest increase in wage growth, evident across several measures of worker compensation,” said Jesse Hurwitz, an economist at Barclays in New York. “We expect that wage growth will continue to move up gradually, helping core inflation return toward target once the headwinds from lower import prices subside.”While a separate report from the National Federation of Independent Business showed its Small Business Optimism Index fell 1.3 points to a two-year low of 93.9 in January, businesses continued to report tightening labor market conditions.Small businesses reported a shortage of qualified workers to fill job openings, prompting some to start raising wages to attract and retain them. The share of small businesses raising compensation increased to its highest level since 2007.”The combination of more job openings and more people quitting could result in pay increases, and we have seen a few other signs that wages have increased as the labour market has tightened,” said Daniel Silver, an economist at JPMorgan in New York.Wage growth, which has been frustratingly slow, picked up significantly in January. Still, growth in average hourly earnings is yet to break above 2.5 percent on a year-over-year basis. Economists say wages need to grow between 3 percent and 3.5 percent to lift inflation near the Fed’s 2 percent target.In a third report on Tuesday, the Commerce Department said wholesale inventories dipped 0.1 percent in December after dropping 0.4 percent in November.The weak inventory data added to soft December construction spending and factory orders reports in suggesting that fourth-quarter GDP growth could be revised down to an annual rate of about 0.4 percent from the 0.7 percent pace reported last month.The government will publish its second GDP growth estimate later this month.last_img read more


US threatens UN members opposing decision on Jerusalem


first_imgUS president Donald Trump excuses reporters after his remarks to them at the start of a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, US, on 20 December 2017. ReutersUS president Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to cut off financial aid to countries that vote in favor of a draft United Nations resolution calling for the United States to withdraw its decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.“They take hundreds of millions of dollars and even billions of dollars, and then they vote against us. Well, we’re watching those votes. Let them vote against us. We’ll save a lot. We don’t care,” Trump told reporters at the White House.The 193-member UN General Assembly will hold a rare emergency special session on Thursday – at the request of Arab and Muslim countries – to vote on a draft resolution, which was vetoed by the United States on Monday in the 15-member UN Security Council.The remaining 14 Security Council members voted in favor of the Egyptian-drafted resolution, which did not specifically mention the United States or Trump but which expressed “deep regret at recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem.”US Ambassador Nikki Haley, in a letter to dozens of UN states on Tuesday seen by Reuters, warned that Trump had asked her to “report back on those countries who voted against us.”She bluntly echoed that call in a Twitter post: “The US will be taking names.”Several senior diplomats said Haley’s warning was unlikely to change many votes in the General Assembly, where such direct, public threats are rare.Miroslav Lajcak, president of the General Assembly, declined to comment on Trump’s remarks, but added: “It’s the right and responsibility of member states to express their views.”A spokesman for UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres also declined to comment on Trump’s remarks on Wednesday.“I like the message that Nikki sent yesterday at the United Nations, for all those nations that take our money and then they vote against us at the Security Council, or they vote against us potentially at the assembly,” Trump said.‘BULLYING’Trump abruptly reversed decades of US policy this month when he recognised Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, generating outrage from Palestinians and the Arab world and concern among Washington’s Western allies.He also plans to move the US embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv. The draft UN resolution calls on all countries to refrain from establishing diplomatic missions in Jerusalem.A senior diplomat from a Muslim country, speaking on condition of anonymity, said of Haley’s letter: “States resort to such blatant bullying only when they know they do not have a moral or legal argument to convince others.”A senior Western diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity, described it as “poor tactics” at the United Nations “but pretty good for Haley 2020 or Haley 2024,” referring to speculation that Haley might run for higher office.“She’s not going to win any votes in the General Assembly or the Security Council, but she is going to win some votes in the US population,” the Western diplomat said.A senior European diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity, agreed Haley was unlikely to sway many UN states.“We are missing some leadership here from the US and this type of letter is definitely not helping to establish US leadership in the Middle East peace process,” the diplomat said.Israel considers Jerusalem its eternal and indivisible capital and wants all embassies based there. Palestinians want the capital of an independent Palestinian state to be in the city’s eastern sector, which Israel captured in a 1967 war and annexed in a move never recognised internationally.“The first name that she should write down is Bolivia,” Bolivia’s UN Ambassador Sacha Sergio Llorentty Solz said of Haley’s message. “We regret the arrogance and disrespect to the sovereign decision of member states and to multilateralism.”Read More: US warns countries over UN vote on Jerusalemlast_img read more


For The 1 In 5 North Texas Kids In Poverty Its Harder


first_img Share BILL ZEEBLE / KERA NEWSJosh Masters listens to Children’s Health licensed counselor Angeleena May using the hospital’s telehealth connection. Children’s Health now has more than 100 telehealth school partners.One in five North Texas children lives in poverty, and more than a quarter million are hungry as their parents struggle to feed them.Those are just a few statistics from a recent 97-page report issued by Children’s Health, the Dallas-based children’s hospital network. The study offers possible solutions, too.The Beyond ABC report only looks at the well-being of children in parts of North Texas, specifically six counties: Dallas, Collin, Denton, Cooke, Grayson and Fannin. It has come out every two years since the late 1990s.How health affects educationThe rate of uninsured kids in Dallas County, as well as Cooke, Fannin and Grayson counties is double the national average. The report says more than 500,000 Texas children lack health insurance, and nearly half of the kids in Dallas County kids are enrolled in Medicaid. The study finds children living in poverty are seven times more likely to be in poor or fair health.Health has a direct impact on education. Yet, low-income parents may be hesitant to get medical care for their kids for several reasons, including cost. Children’s Health points to its telemedicine program as a way to help.For example, if a child’s sick in school, he or she usually goes to the nurse. Then, the parent typically gets called, has to leave work, possibly lose pay, then get to a doctor’s office by car, bus or a friend. Dr. Stormee Williams, who oversees the telehealth program with more than 100 school partners, says telemedicine offers another option.“We can call in, have a live video interaction,” Williams said. “The nurse has an electronic stethoscope, otoscope, dermscope, so that, live, we can diagnose ear infections, look at the throat, listen to lungs in a child with asthma, and actually make a diagnosis and treat if necessary and send prescriptions, electronically.”  Dallas’ problem with povertyThe report also finds one in five North Texas kids lives in poverty and offers another way to look at that. Nearly 500,000 children in North Texas qualify for free or reduced-price school meals. Food insecurity in all of the six counties in the study exceeds the national average.In the Dallas school district, 90 percent of the students are considered low-income.Mike Koprowski used to be with Dallas ISD, and while he’s concerned about the poverty rates in Dallas, he’s even more concerned about neighborhood segregation in Dallas. He calls Dallas one of the most segregated cities by race and income in the country.“When you have areas of concentrated poverty, that creates a lot of challenges in the school. So any educator will tell you a kid living in poverty brings challenges into the classroom,” he said. “But when an entire school building is concentrated with low-income kids, the challenges get more difficult.” Koprowski calls that segregation a disaster for Dallas.Proposed solutionsThe report recommends supporting increased development of mixed-income neighborhoods and more widespread acceptance of housing assistance vouchers.Some say lawmakers should get involved.Matt Moore, Children’s Health vice president for government relations, says elected leaders often say it’s important to improve the state of children, but they don’t necessarily take action.“So, I think that the interest is there; we see it from both sides of the aisle,” Moore says. “We see it among the deepest of red tea party members; we see it among the most blue of liberal members. The interest is there, but it just seems that, right now, the moment is aligned against us.”That leaves nonprofits, like the North Texas Food Bank, education groups and health care providers, playing a big role. The goal is to help kids get the basics for success when obstacles block the way. Dr. Williams says it all matters because she’s looking to the future. “We know that healthy kids learn better. And children who’ve learned well end up being healthier adults,” Dr. Williams says.The report also suggests that schools prioritize support for student health and healthy behaviors by providing more nutritious meals and more physical activity and focusing on students’ behavioral and emotional health.Read the full report 2017 Beyond ABC Report by KERANews on Scribdlast_img read more


Dr Hooker Scholarship Gala


first_imgA Centennial Legend’s Scholarship Gala will be held 7 p.m., June 13 in Dr. Hooker’s honor in the metropolitan area at Marriot Wardman Park, 2660 Woodley Rd NW. Tickets cost $20. This year the goal is to raise $10,000 to $20,000 to provide scholarships for college bound students or students currently enrolled in college under the Dr. Olivia J. Hooker Scholarship Fund. This event would feature universally recognizable women that have made great strides in their distinguished careers and Dr. Olivia Hooker’s Scholarship recipients. The women’s and students’ achievements will be highlighted with brief presentations or a short film as a part of their introduction. For more information, contact LCDR Rhonda Fleming-Makell (Retired) at (301) 266-5050 or rflemingmakell@aol.com.last_img