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Tortoise shell effect butterfly hair claw clip, Is pretty, will hold only thick hair


first_imgDoes the work and is actually very as well.Really strong clips and attractive to seem at,gorgeous color.Fantastic for thick medium size hair. Perfect for my thick under shoulder hair. Holds it really effectively – not much too significant or modest. One of the claws broke soon after couple of months but nevertheless really good.Key specs for Tortoise shell effect butterfly hair claw clip:Tort brown plastic claw clipButterfly design to wingsChunky claw with teeth on insideMeasures 6.75cm along teeth by 5cm wideButterfly top measures 5cm by 5.5cmComments from buyers“nice looking piece, Pretty but too big, Butterfly claw hair clip, I really like this hair clip, Perfect for thick medium length hair, She is very happy with it”Pretty, excellent dimensions and terrific excellent.Quick supply and superior good quality, thanks. Great minimal clip for holding my mane in put.I truly like this hair clip. I really like this hair clip, really like the model and design and style. Would have liked it to be a minimal bigger as i have extremely lengthy thick hair to keep in place but in general a wonderful obtain.Beautiful company and pleasing merchandise.This very little detail can maintain my gf hair up even if she have a large amount of it.Its not as significant as i was hoping it to be, its fairly a rigid plastic hair claw which just isn’t very superior to maintain my sleeky hair. I like the shape of the claw alone even though as it is in a position to hold really a good deal of hair, its just not exactly ideal for mine as it won’t maintain it limited and i need to retain redoing it each now and then.I really like my hair clip, executing what it must do.Keeps all my hair up nicely all day.This is a gorgeous item, it can be genuinely very. On the other hand, it can be fairly significant and regrettably doesn’t hold my extended (beneath shoulder size but layered) thick hair in put, my hair just slides out so i are unable to seriously use it. It could be better for people with seriously very long unlayered hair.It’s a good grip, not as fantastic as my old one that broke but it really is fairly respectable and i have seriously thick hair.Is pretty, will hold only thick hair. Is fairly ,will maintain only thick hair,mine was damaged in write-up ,so i returned it.Favored the design but two of the claws broke just after a couple takes advantage of so not extremely strong.Little bit in excess of leading with packaging but charming.Keeps my hair out of my facial area so does the career, plus it really really. I could possibly get a number of more of these.Wonderful hair claw, eye-catching butterfly design and potent grip for my fantastic hair.My former purchase that had ‘broken ‘ immediately after hardly any use has now been replaced by the seller/s. I am delighted with the seller as very well as the item the earlier product must have been compromised in some way right before it reached me, that’s why broke. Thanks, my crystal trend .But just the occupation for my hair as not really thick.Pretty cozy clip – suited for all day wear will obtain once again.last_img read more


Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, September 28, 2018


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dry weather today should come with less cloud cover. Yesterday clouds and pesky moisture managed to get in over parts of the state, even though we were dominated by high pressure. Today we are on the backside of the high and should see better south winds moving clouds away. No new precipitation is expected, and we should keep the dry weather in for most of the state for Saturday as well. Moisture overnight tonight into tomorrow morning is shifting farther north, and should stay in Ontario and back into Michigan, but we do see minor precipitation trying to move into the northern third of Ohio overnight tomorrow night into Sunday morning. Moisture totals will be limited to a few hundredths to perhaps a tenth from US 30 northward. The rest of the state sees nothing. Dry weather holds through Monday and early Tuesday morning.Our next system brings scattered showers for Tuesday. That should bring a few hundredths to .5” to about 60% of the state. The heaviest rains (near that half inch level) will likely show up in NW Ohio. We are going to keep a second push of moisture from midnight Wednesday night through Thursday. That wave brings .25”-.75” to about 75% of the state. That front pushes through from NW to southeast. All action is done by Friday, except down in farm southern parts of the state, near the Ohio river. There, we can see showers continue through midday and early afternoon Friday. The map at right shows combined precipitation from the two waves next week.The weekend looks cooler, and we may have trouble breaking the clouds up. We do not see a lot of new precipitation threats for Saturday and Sunday right now, but we also may be looking at a few hit and miss spits and sprinkles. The cold air really starts to drag in as the weekend finishes and we start the second full week of October.The extended forecast still has a very strong front for the 9th-11th. Data suggests that the heaviest rains and the strongest part of the system will pass by to our west and north, but this far out, we would not jump on that solution yet. This system is very strong and could have some 1-2.5” rain potential with it, if we hit the strongest part. We follow that up with another slower moving, but less heavy system for the 13th, which could bring up to half an inch of rain, slowly lifting in from the SW. Temps likely cool off quickly behind the system on the 10th and 11th.last_img read more


Too much in kitty


first_imgBJP MP Ravi Shankar Prasad, who was recently elevated as deputy leader of Opposition in the Rajya Sabha and is also the party’s general secretary, has offered to quit one of the posts.Sources said Prasad has informed party president Nitin Gadkari that as he is already the BJP’s general secretary and chief spokesperson, he is ready to relinquish charge of one. The matter is now in Gadkari’s court.last_img


Family testifies about pain of searching 24 years for missing Aboriginal woman


first_imgMEMBERTOU, N.S. – The 78-year-old Mi’kmaq elder cradles the grainy photo of his lost daughter laminated on his smart phone — a reminder of his hope to find her one day.It’s black and white, but Virginia Sue Pictou’s brown eyes sparkle, and her father Robert James Pictou has added the lines, “Forever in my heart.” He keeps a full-sized version propped up at breakfast each morning.The Nova Scotia-born Pictou was brought to a medical centre in Bangor, Maine, by police after being beaten on April 24, 1993.But as doctors briefly turned their attention to a shooting victim in the trauma unit, she quietly left, never to be seen again, family members say.“To me, as a father, every time the subject comes up, it’s just like it happened yesterday. It’s all there,” the father said during an interview while attending the National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls in Cape Breton.“How is she going to rest in peace, could somebody explain that to me?”The family testified at the hearings at Membertou First Nation on Wednesday morning, repeating their account of how they suspect Virginia died violently, and talking of their hope state police will one day locate her remains and make arrests.Virginia had seven small children at her home in Easton, Maine, two of whom perished in a 1990 fire.Francis Pictou, 52, testified Wednesday he’s convinced Virginia left the hospital to return home to be with her five remaining children because she didn’t wish to leave them with her violent husband.Agnes Gould, the oldest sister, testified that Virginia repeatedly experienced domestic violence and had frequently come to her seeking shelter.Robert John Pictou, a 54-year-brother, told the commission he’d read a police record describing her beating by her husband and brother-in-law on a main street of Bangor on the day she went to the hospital.Like other families who’ve spoken before the inquiry during its cross-country hearings, the siblings say they’re determined to continue their search for information on her case.“We followed every lead we could. We searched fields. We searched swamps. We talked to family. We did investigations, we hired private investigators. It’s gone nowhere,” said Robert John Pictou.Searches undertaken by Aboriginal families that go on for decades — sometimes across borders — have been a frequent theme at the inquiry as it has crossed the country.On Wednesday, the inquiry’s commissioners said 900 people have registered to tell their story, and signalled they will be asking Ottawa for an extension and more money to hear the cases.Gould said she’d like others to hear and be inspired by their resolution during the 24-year quest.“As we always say, our case is one in a thousand,” she said during the inquiry.As the family spoke, the commissioners released an interim report that called for the provinces, territories and federal government to create a national police task force to handle requests from families and survivors to reopen cases and review investigations.Commissioner Michele Audette said she has repeatedly heard of cases where police forces are failing to adequately respond to cases that have involved missing or murdered aboriginal women.A spokesman for the Maine State Police didn’t respond to an emailed request for comment in the Pictou case.However, Robert John Pictou said that the investigation is one among 50 on a cold-case list, and added that a victim’s advocate from Maine is in contact with the family.The brother said having a joint national task force in Canada would be welcomed by his family, as it might be able to work with American agencies in cases of Aboriginal victims.“As it stands right now, we have zero information on our missing sister. That unfortunately is not unusual,” he said.The history of murdered and missing Mi’kmaq women in the United States goes back for generations, as Mi’kmaq and Maliseet band members cross for work, marriage and family ties.One of the cases that led to the push for the national inquiry was the 1974 death of Aboriginal activist Anna Mae Aquash, a Mi’kmaq from Nova Scotia.She was killed during a period of protests by the American Indian Movement and prosecutors allege she was murdered on orders from AIM, because the group believed she was an FBI informant.Her family struggled for years to have investigations re-opened, and to have her body repatriated and buried in her home community.Francis Pictou said for siblings and parents, the lost women are never forgotten and simply recovering their body and bringing it home would be a source of closure.“We know in our hearts, we know she’s gone,” he told the inquiry.“Even if it feels like an endless lead, go after it,” he said. “You might regret it later that you didn’t go after that one possibility.”Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more


Petition tries to push NWT government to reopen Elders residence


first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN NewsSharon Lafferty watched both of her elderly parents leave their home to access medical support services.Neither wanted to go, but with the closure of the Elder’s facility in Denı́nu Kų́ę́ – Fort Resolution, Northwest Territories, remaining in the isolated community became unmanageable.“I think if we cared for them in our community they would not get lonesome. They would have more of their traditional foods, visitors, support from their own caregivers as oppose to having to meet everyone and make new friends,” Lafferty said.When Lafferty’s mother suffered a stroke she was medevaced to Stanton Territorial Hospital in Yellowknife, where she received care for over a year.Her husband was left behind.“At that age separating her from my Dad affected his health. He was a diabetic and he stopped caring for his health. He was so lonesome caring for my mum,” Lafferty said.Her 87-year-old father also moved to the next community over in Hay River, but it wasn’t smooth sailing.“When he was at medical appointments, they (health practitioners) were wondering why he wasn’t talking. He has to have a boogie board where he writes things down to talk to him and then he will verbally talk back, but they didn’t know he was deaf.“There was no communication between facilities,” she said.The Elder’s Facility closed a decade ago due to funding cuts from the Territorial government.It sits partially occupied by government offices.Across the road, Mavis Klause, Sharon’s cousin packs up her house.Medical travel has become unbearable for the 71-year-old.“I have never seen the same doctor twice in five years. You don’t go see a doctor because you want to. The nurse will tell you when to see the doctor,” Klause said.(Sharon Lafferty, middle, sitting with her cousins. On the right is Mavis Klause)She said she has waited over two years to see a foot specialist for her diabetes.More accessible healthcare was not the only reason in her decision to move.Klause also cited fear of crime as another motivator and said that her doors must be locked because of a nearby bootlegger.Two doors down Howard Beaulieu has a similar story.Lafferty introduced us to him and acted as an interpreter.Beaulieu lives alone and has limited mobility after suffering a stroke some years ago.“When Howard wanted to raise his concerns over the crime around his house. I went over and told the personal support workers. I was told he would have to call housing and then they would have to call the RCMP.,” Lafferty said.Howard expressed his frustration over having to contact different agencies over the phone with his limited speech.“If something were to happen how could he communicate this to the RCMP going through a Yellowknife detachment and them not being able to understand his English because of his paralysis. You have to know him for a while to understand his English,” Lafferty said.In the old Elder’s facility residents were able to press a button to access either a secretary or security.When Beaulieu hit his head two weeks ago, he said there was no one to call over the weekend.“Ten days later he says his head is still sore. I am wondering when they brought him to the nursing station, did the nurse tell his personal support worker to follow up if he had soreness or dizziness,” Lafferty said.In the fall of 2018, a petition prompted by the Band Office circulated in the community.It called on the NWT Health Minister to reopen the Elder’s Facility and received over 100 signatures.The local MLA read the petition in the Legislative Assembly, but there has been no public discussion since.APTN News, contacted the NWT’s Health and Social Services Authority but were unable to receive an interview in time for this article.Lafferty, Klause and Bealieu all signed the petition, but whether or not any of them will live in the community long enough to see a positive change remains unknown.cmorrittjacobs@aptn.ca@aptncharlottelast_img read more