Tag: 南京夜生活


Gallery Ohio State vs Michigan


OSU football coach Urban Meyer high-fives fans as the team enters Ohio Stadium for the team’s game against Michigan on Nov. 26. The Buckeyes won 30-27. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo Editor The Ohio State Buckeyes game against the Michigan Wolverines took two overtime periods for a team to come out victorious. OSU junior H-back Curtis Samuel scored the game-winning touchdown in the second overtime to give the Buckeyes a 30-27 win.


Football James Laurinaitis retires from NFL


Former Ohio State linebacker James Laurinaitis played eight seasons in the NFL. Credit: Courtesy of TNSOne of the most decorated linebackers in the history of the Ohio State football program has retired from the NFL.James Laurinaitis, who played for the Buckeyes from 2005-2008, played in the NFL for eight seasons — seven years for the St. Louis Rams and last season with the New Orleans Saints.Throughout his NFL-tenure, Laurinaitis totaled 869 tackles, 16.5 sacks and picked off 10 passes. A two-time Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year and 2007 Butkus Award winner, Laurinaitis was selected by the Rams with the 35th overall pick in the 2009 NFL Draft.Laurinaitis became the Rams all-time leader in tackles in 2015 with 852.pic.twitter.com/6kwiNi6UzM— James Laurinaitis (@JLaurinaitis55) April 11, 2017 read more


Mens Basketball No 16 Ohio State to face winner of Penn StateNorthwestern


Ohio State senior forward Jae’Sean Tate (1) blocks a shot in the first half of the game against Penn State on Jan. 25 in the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorPenn State has been the kryptonite for No. 16 Ohio State the entire season. It has accounted for two of the Buckeyes’ three total losses in conference play and is the main reason the Buckeyes did not capture the regular-season Big Ten title.After the Nittany Lions lost 76-64 to Nebraska on Sunday, they could now be in a position to face Ohio State once again. The Buckeyes are the No. 2 seed in the Big Ten tournament and will face the winner of the No. 7 Penn State and No. 10 Northwestern matchup in the third round of the bracket at 6:30 p.m. Friday in Madison Square Garden in New York City.Penn State first won 82-79 on a near-half-court, buzzer-beating shot from guard Tony Carr in Columbus on Jan. 25, and then throttled the Buckeyes 79-56 in State College, Pennsylvania, on Feb. 15.Ohio State faced Northwestern just once this season and survived a late push by the Wildcats to win 71-65 on Jan. 17. read more


Escondido couple escapes serious injury after tree falls on their home


first_img Posted: February 15, 2019 February 15, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Escondido couple escapes serious injury after tree falls on their home KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsESCONDIDO (KUSI)- An Escondido family escaped injury after a tree came crashing down into their home overnight. This happened at a home on Jesmond Drive around 3 this morning. A man and his pregnant wife were asleep when the tree tore through the roof of their bedroom.Both managed to get out safely. Fire crews were called-in to survey the damage.The tree destroyed an outside shed, and uprooted an electrical box. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more


Stolen car on fire in Bonita neighborhood


first_img KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A car fire in the Lynwood Hills neighborhood in Bonita prompted first responders to the scene shortly after noon near the corner of Lynwood Drive and Lynnwood Lane.  According to the Deputy Sheriff, the car was reported stolen and no driver could be found at the scene.Story updated at 10:18 p.m. Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitter Posted: August 24, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, center_img Updated: 10:19 PM August 24, 2019 Stolen car on fire in Bonita neighborhoodlast_img read more


Physicists close two loopholes while violating local realism


first_imgPhysicists performed a Bell experiment between the islands of La Palma and Tenerife at an altitude of 2,400 m. Starting with an entangled pair of photons, one photon was sent 6 km away to Alice, and the other photon was sent 144 km away to Bob. The physicists took several steps to simultaneously close the locality loophole and freedom-of-choice loophole. Image credit: Thomas Scheidl, et al. and Google Earth, ©2008 Google, Map Data ©Tele Atlas. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — The latest test in quantum mechanics provides even stronger support than before for the view that nature violates local realism and is thus in contradiction with a classical worldview. By performing an experiment in which photons were sent from one Canary Island to another, physicists have shown that two of three loopholes can be closed simultaneously in a test that violates Bell’s inequality (and therefore local realism) by more than 16 standard deviations. Performing a Bell test that closes all three loopholes still remains a challenge, but the physicists predict that such an experiment might be “on the verge of being possible” with state-of-the-art technology. More information: Thomas Scheidl, et al. “Violation of local realism with freedom of choice.” 19708-19713, PNAS, November 16, 2010, vol. 107, no. 46. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1002780107 The physicists, who belong to the group of Rupert Ursin and Anton Zeilinger and were all at either the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna or the University of Vienna when performing the experiments in 2008, have published their study on the new Bell test in the early edition of PNAS. As they explain in their study, local realism consists of both realism – the view that reality exists with definite properties even when not being observed – and locality – the view that an object can only be influenced by its immediate surroundings. If a Bell test shows that a measurement of one object can influence the state of a second, distant object, then local realism has been violated.”The question of whether nature can be understood in terms of classical concepts and explained by local realism is one of the deepest in physics,” coauthor Johannes Kofler told PhysOrg.com. “Getting Bell tests as loophole-free as possible and confirming quantum mechanics is therefore an extremely important task. From a technological perspective, certain protocols of quantum cryptography (which is entering the market at the moment) are based on entanglement and violation of Bell’s inequality. This so-called ‘unconditional security’ must in practice take care of the loopholes in Bell tests.”The physicists explained that, in experimental tests, there are three loopholes that allow observed violations of local realism to still be explained by local realistic theories. These three loopholes can involve locality (if there is not a large enough distance separating the two objects at the time of measurement), the freedom to choose any measurement settings (so measurement settings may be influenced by hidden variables, or vice versa), and fair sampling (a small fraction of observed objects may not accurately represent all objects due to detection inefficiencies).Previous experiments have closed the first loophole, which was done by ensuring a large spatial separation between the two objects (in this case, two quantum mechanically entangled photons) so that measurements of the objects could not be influenced by each other. Special relativity then ensures that the objects cannot influence each other, since no physical signals can travel faster than the speed of light. In these experiments, classically unexplainable correlations were still observed between the objects, indicating a violation of local realism. (The fair sampling loophole was closed in another earlier experiment using ions, where large detection efficiencies can be reached.) Debunking and closing quantum entanglement ‘loopholes’center_img Citation: Physicists close two loopholes while violating local realism (2010, November 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-physicists-loopholes-violating-local-realism.html Explore further In the current experiment, the physicists simultaneously ruled out both the locality loophole and the freedom-of-choice loophole. They performed a Bell test between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, located 144 km apart. On La Palma, they generated pairs of entangled photons using a laser diode. Then they locally delayed one photon in a 6-km-long optical fiber (29.6-microsecond traveling time) and sent it to one measurement station (Alice), and sent the other photon 144 km away (479-microsecond traveling time) through open space to the other measurement station (Bob) on Tenerife. The scientists took several steps to close both loopholes. For ruling out the possibility of local influence, they added a delay in the optical fiber to Alice to ensure that the measurement events there were space-like separated from those on Tenerife such that no physical signal could be interchanged. Also, the measurement settings were randomly determined by quantum random number generators. To close the freedom-of-choice loophole, the scientists spatially separated the setting choice and the photon emission, which ensured that the setting choice and photon emission occurred at distant locations and nearly simultaneously (within 0.5 microseconds of each other). The scientists also added a delay to Bob’s random setting choice. These combined measures eliminated the possibility of the setting choice or photon emission events influencing each other. But again, despite these measures, the scientists still detected correlations between the separated photons that can only be explained by quantum mechanics, violating local realism.By showing that local realism can be violated even when the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes are closed, the experiment greatly reduces the number of “hidden variable theories” that might explain the correlations while obeying local realism. Further, these theories appear to be beyond the possibility of experimental testing, since they propose such things as allowing actions into the past or assuming a common cause for all events. Now, one of the greatest challenges in quantum mechanics is simultaneously closing the fair-sampling loophole along with the others to demonstrate a completely loophole-free Bell test. Such an experiment will require very high-efficiency detectors and other high-quality components, along with the ability to achieve extremely high transmission. Also, the test would have to operate at a critical distance between Alice and Bob that is not too large, to minimize photon loss, and not too small, to ensure sufficient separation. Although these requirements are beyond the current experimental set-up due to high loss between the islands, the scientists predict that these requirements may be met in the near future. “Performing a loophole-free Bell test is certainly one of the biggest open experimental challenges in the foundations of quantum mechanics,” Kofler said. “Various groups are working towards that goal. It is on the edge of being technologically feasible. Such an experiment will probably be done within the next five years.” Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more


October 29 2016Film director Aimee Madsen and Cos


first_imgOctober 29, 2016Film director Aimee Madsen and Cosanti Foundation Directors Mary Hoadley and Roger Tomalty are in New Mexico to screen PAOLO SOLERI – BEYOND FORM, last night in Albuquerque. [photos by Aimee Madsen]Aimee:We screened to a sold out audience in Albuquerque. So grateful to every one who made it possible. Next comes Santa Fe on the 29th!see: http://www.architecturesantafe.org/film-series.htmllast_img


Rep VanSingel helps state House approve more money for road improvements


first_img Plan helps Lake, Oceana and Newaygo countiesState Rep. Scott VanSingel on Wednesday voted in favor of a plan to invest an additional $175 million into road repairs across Michigan as soon as possible.“Lake, Oceana and Newaygo counties will see a significant amount of money for their road repairs,” said VanSingel, of Grant.  “This plan will help our local communities and give them the resources they need to improve our roads.”The money included in the bill approved this week comes in addition to previous changes that provide more funding for road and bridge projects in Michigan.The new bill includes money for counties, cities and villages throughout Michigan.Some of the estimated local allocations include Lake County ($300,233), Oceana County ($383,144), Newaygo County ($536,471), Baldwin ($12,185), Fremont ($35,102), Grant ($7,483), Hart ($16,607), Hesperia ($9,589), Luther ($6,592), New Era ($5,531), Newaygo ($19,581), Pentwater ($10,217), Rothbury ($4,926), Walkerville ($4,254) and White Cloud ($12,835).The money is left over from a previous state government budget cycle and is already available, meaning no budget cuts or additional fees are required for the investment.House Bill 4321 advances to the Senate for further consideration.### 22Feb Rep. VanSingel helps state House approve more money for road improvements Categories: VanSingel Newslast_img read more