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Germany moves forward by presenting unloved framework to EU courts


first_imgShare MoneyMatrix boosts wire transfer options by integrating Klarna’s Sofort August 24, 2020 Mateusz Juroszek – Non-stop STS will expand amid industry disruptions August 12, 2020 Seeking to relaunch its gambling marketplace on 1 July 2021, Germany has submitted the revised framework of its Fourth Edition of the ‘State Treaty on Gambling’ to the European Union.Despite numerous revisions, the framework has yet to be ratified by the nation’s 16 federal Länder (states).The make-up of the treaty continues to be debated by regional MPs at the Bundestag federal council, in which 13 states must ratify the treaty by 31 March 2021 for Germany’s new gambling framework to be passed into law.Should the mandate be ratified, Germany will establish its federal legislative framework for operating gambling services until 31 December 2028, when Länder will be allowed to revise or opt-out of the treaty.Despite a clear pathway being formed towards market regulation, German gambling’s legislative progress has underwhelmed all industry stakeholders.At present, licensed incumbents will face a €1,000 deposit limit combined with stringent restrictions applied across all online gambling verticals.Sports betting incumbents will face a market with undefined in-play wagering restrictions, which has led trade bodies and stakeholders to question whether the State Treaty’s framework will be competitive against the black-market.Despite a last-minute reprieve allowing online casino games, licensees will see slot games limited to a maximum €1 stake. Furthermore, tables games will be maintained under the domain of state-sanctioned monopolies.Further to its punitive restrictions, the State Treaty has drafted a convoluted licensing structure, in which operator fees will be determined through projections of turnover combined with individual levies.Should the State Treaty secure its approval, the chancery of the Länder of Saxony-Anhalt will begin its remit as the regulatory authority for federal gambling, opening a year-long licensing window for foreign and domestic incumbents.Making its way to EU courts, State Treaty backers will hope that the amended framework secures a positive response from European commissioners reviewing the legislation.Reviewing Bundesrat proposals last August, the European Commission rejected the treaty’s technical provisions attached to sports betting legislation as failing to meet EU market requirements.Sanctioning a ‘blue letter’ warning, the EC cautioned German lawmakers on enforcing a termination of online casino services, combined with a player spending cap set at €1,000 and further limitations on in-play markets.Leading the EU’s business regulatory supervision, the EC urged the Bundesrat to discontinue proceeding with developing its legislation – a call that would be rejected by the Länder of Nordrhein-Westfalen who underlined that no changes should be implemented despite EC objections.10 months on from the EC’s notice, industry stakeholders now question whether Bundesrat really ever believed it could regulate a gambling marketplace under its State Treaty terms. Submit StumbleUpon Martin Lycka – Regulatory high temperatures cancel industry’s ‘silly season’ August 11, 2020 Share Related Articleslast_img read more


House Democrats advance on war withdrawal front


first_imgWASHINGTON – On the eve of a critical vote, House Democrats labored Thursday to lock down a majority behind a Sept. 1, 2008, deadline for the withdrawal of U.S. combat troops from Iraq, the sternest test yet for a determined new majority eager to challenge President George W. Bush. “If it comes off, it’s a superb accomplishment,” said Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., as the party’s leaders cajoled liberals who want an even faster timetable and moderates fearful of tying the hands of the commander in chief and generals in the field. Democratic aides expressed growing confidence of success when the vote is called, and four of the bill’s most consistent critics said they had told Speaker Nancy Pelosi they would help pass it, even though they intend to personally vote against it. “While I cannot betray my conscience, I cannot stand in the way of passing a measure that puts a concrete end date on this unnecessary war,” said one of the four, Rep. Barbara Lee of California. An aide to Pelosi confirmed that the speaker had met with Lee and California Reps. Lynn Woolsey, Maxine Waters and Diane Watson. But with the leadership lobbying intensively on its own, it was not clear which lawmakers, if any, had swung behind the bill as a result of the offer the four had made. Throughout the day, a string of liberal opponents of the war swung behind a measure they deemed insufficient. “I want this war ended today. If I thought it would help this war ending sooner by voting against the bill, I would vote against it in a heartbeat,” said Rep. Jim McGovern of Massachusetts, who sponsored legislation for a troop withdrawal in 2005. “But I don’t believe that to be the case,” he added of the measure, which combines funding for the war, the troop withdrawal deadline and billions of dollars in funding for politically popular programs at home ranging from farm aid to relief for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. The legislation marks Congress’ most direct challenge to date of Bush’s policy in a war that has claimed the lives of nearly 3,200 U.S. troops. As debate began in the House, Republicans criticized it vociferously. “The bill is a sham,” said Rep. Harold Rogers of Kentucky, adding it would “provide fodder for our enemies abroad.” Bush has threatened to veto the bill, opposing both the troop-withdrawal provision and billions of dollars in spending that Democrats added. Money troubles Defense Secretary Robert Gates said any delay in approving the funds could “have a genuinely adverse effect on the readiness of the Army and the quality of life for soldiers and their families.” White House press secretary Tony Snow sharpened the message. “There’s a very real chance that money for the troops will run out while members of Congress are on vacation,” he said. “Is that the message you want to send to men and women who are putting their lives on the line?” Across the Capitol, a Senate committee launched legislation taking a slightly different approach – setting a date for the beginning of a withdrawal but only a nonbinding goal of March 31, 2008, for the final exit of combat forces. The measure cleared the Senate Appropriations Committee on a voice vote, but Republicans said they would attempt to strip out the withdrawal provisions when the issue comes before the full Senate next week. Senate Democrats fell short of a majority, 50-48, last week on a similar attempt to set a timeline for the war. Since then, Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and others have made changes in hopes of persuading Sens. Ben Nelson of Nebraska and Mark Pryor of Arkansas to swing behind the withdrawal proposal. The changes include a series of suggested goals for the Iraqi government to meet to provide for its own security, enhance democracy and distribute its oil wealth fairly. Looking for support More than two months after Democrats took power, the main focus in the war debate was on the House, where Pelosi and other leading Democrats chipped away at holdouts. Rep. Jim McDermott of Washington, a 10th-term lawmaker and longtime opponent of the war, said he would support the measure. He called the legislation a “bare minimum but dramatically better than what we have today, which is a war without end, from a president capable only of escalation, not negotiation.” Rep. Hank Johnson of Georgia, new to Congress, said he was leaning toward supporting the legislation, as well. Like McDermott, he said he wanted a faster end to the war, but also said he had listened to the arguments of leadership that the current measure was the most that could be passed given the current makeup of the House. “What we are here to do is to govern,” Johnson said of the new Democratic majority, which came to power in January after midterm elections framed by voter discontent with the war. Democrats hold 233 seats in the House, meaning they can lose 15 votes from their own rank and file and still be assured of passing the measure. Whatever the vote count, some war foes disagreed with the strategy. “I think the Democrats are doing it all wrong,” said Rep. Dennis Kucinich, D-Ohio. “We don’t agree with them,” said Rep. Lynn Woolsey, D-Calif. She said she and others believe the party must “honor what the voters of November said, which is to be bold, end the war and bring the troops home.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more