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Garth Hudson, Taj Mahal, Warren Haynes, & More Celebrate The Last Waltz’s 40th Anniversary In LA


first_imgEdit this setlist | More Warren Haynes setlists There are few places in this or any universe where and when one could truly replicate The Last Waltz, the famed final show played by The Band on Thanksgiving of 1976. In 2012, Levon Helm, the group’s most iconic voice, passed on to That Great Gig in the Sky. In 2015, Allen Toussaint, the New Orleans legend who arranged the horn section for the original show, passed on.And that’s to say nothing of all the members of The Band and their special guests who are now either deceased or have aged out of regular performance.That hasn’t stopped the music from carrying on through a 40th anniversary tour of The Last Waltz. Nor did it to do anything to dampen the spirit of the stop at the Orpheum Theatre in downtown Los Angeles. The ornately decorated venue proved to be a perfect host for Warren Haynes, Jamey Johnson and the cast of characters who’ve criss-crossed the country reviving a rock-and-roll classic.From The Band standards like “Up on Cripple Creek”, “Rag Mama Rag”, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and (of course) “The Weight” to blues standards and then-contemporary covers, this band breathed new life into an epic concert that, save for the fortunate few who were at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco on that November night, is left to musical lore beyond Martin Scorsese‘s famous concert film.Haynes, among the most decorated fill-in frontman for historic rock outfits, wailed with voice and axe through two rambling sets (and a two-song encore) with every bit of bravado and brilliance on display during his stints with the Dead, the Allman Brothers Band and Gov’t Mule. Johnson, a relative spring chick at 41, more than held his own belting out numbers, including “Georgia On My Mind”, and flaunting flowing locks from his head and beard. They were backed by a colorful cast of characters on horns (led by Mark Mullins), drums (Terence Higgins) and keyboard (Danny Louis).No tribute to The Last Waltz would be complete without a stack of cameos, and this one was no exception. Dave Malone, of New Orleans’ Radiators fame, joined in for a rendition of CSNY‘s “Helpless” and The Band’s “This Wheel’s On Fire.” Cyril Neville, of the Meters and the Neville Brothers, lent his talents on percussion and vocals, even stealing the show for a spell during the Bo Diddley classic “Who Do You Love.” Taj Mahal—clad in a red shirt, black pants and a white hat—seized the stage on multiple occasions, to belt out “The Shape I’m In”, “Life Is a Carnival” and Bob Dylan‘s “Forever Young” and rip some steel guitar on Robert Johnson‘s “Kind Hearted Woman Blues.”The crowd, which came to its feet after just about every song, got many a joyful earful from some who were on stage for the original Last Waltz. Steady Rollin’ Bob Margolin, who was then a young understudy to the aged Muddy Waters, “laid some pipe” on slide guitar during a rendition of Muddy’s “Mannish Boy” and regaled the audience with tales of late-night jams with Dylan, Helm, Eric Clapton, Ronnie Wood and Paul Butterfield. Dr. John, with the clothing and countenance of the same Crescent City eccentric he (presumably) was 40 years ago, banged away on the piano and lent his gravelly voice to Bayou favorites like “Such a Night” and “Down South in New Orleans.”And while most of The Band has either retired or passed on, there was one member with enough juice left in the tank to join this gang on the road: Garth Hudson. The silver-haired 79-year-old needed a hand shuffling onto and off of the stage, but once he sat down at the piano, it was as if no time had passed since the original show. He tickled the ivories to perfection toward the end of the show and into “The Weight” before the group concluded Set No. 2 with Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released.”Who knows how many (if any) of the original Waltzers will be around for a 50th anniversary in 10 years? By then, with any luck, there will be a whole new generation of great musicians who are ready, willing and able to get the ghosts of The Band back together for yet another Last Waltz.Below you can view fan-shot videos of both sets, courtesy of Pay Myers: Enjoy the gallery below, courtesy of Brandon Weil.center_img Load remaining imageslast_img read more


Marquette, Seton Hall meet in Big East quarters


first_img Associated Press March 11, 2020 PLENTY OF EXPERIENCE: Senior leadership could play a big role in the outcome of this game. Myles Powell, Quincy McKnight and Romaro Gill have combined to account for 53 percent of Seton Hall’s scoring this season. For Marquette, Markus Howard, Sacar Anim, Koby McEwen and Brendan Bailey have combined to account for 72 percent of all Marquette scoring, including 104 percent of the team’s points over its last five games.OFFENSIVE THREAT: Howard has either made or assisted on 50 percent of all Marquette field goals over the last five games. Howard has 48 field goals and 19 assists in those games.SCORING THRESHOLDS: Marquette is 12-0 when it limits opponents to 68 or fewer points, and 6-12 when opposing teams exceed 68 points. Seton Hall is 13-0 when holding opponents to 66 points or fewer, and 8-9 whenever teams score more than 66 on the Pirates.ACCOUNTING FOR ASSISTS: The Pirates have recently used assists to create buckets more often than the Golden Eagles. Seton Hall has an assist on 50 of 85 field goals (58.8 percent) over its past three matchups while Marquette has assists on 38 of 79 field goals (48.1 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Marquette as a team has made 10 3-pointers per game this season, which is ninth-most among Division I teams. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditWhatsappNo. 6 seed Marquette (18-12, 8-10) vs. No. 3 seed Seton Hall (21-9, 13-5)Big East Conference Tourney Quarterfinals, Madison Square Garden, New York; Thursday, 8:30 p.m. EDTBOTTOM LINE: Marquette is set to take on Seton Hall in the quarterfinals of the Big East tournament. Seton Hall swept the two-game regular season series. The teams last met on Feb. 29, when the Pirates shot 53.3 percent from the field while holding Marquette to just 43.3 percent en route to a nine-point victory.center_img Marquette, Seton Hall meet in Big East quarters ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6last_img read more


No. 21 Syracuse fails to upset No. 7 Notre Dame in one of program’s biggest-ever games


first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 19, 2017 at 7:13 pm Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langer The game was going to be different for Syracuse. It was clear at the start of the year, when SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said he wanted to prove his team belonged in the same conversation with other upper-echelon squads, like preseason No. 1 Notre Dame.The expectation only ramped up in the last month as Syracuse kept its program-record 18-game home winning streak alive. Then, 11 days ago, Syracuse announced a partnership with 13 local companies that all offered group ticket discounts in attempt to set an attendance record for a women’s game in the Carrier Dome.The Orange never pretended this game was like any other. It wasn’t. Not after the North Carolina game last week. Not during the media availability session this week. Not during the first play of the game, when Brittney Sykes rose up for a deep 3-pointer from the left wing, drained it and held up three fingers on each hand with thunderous Carrier Dome crowd as the backdrop.“It’s a big game,” Hillsman had said. “We can’t deflect that.”No. 21 Syracuse (18-9, 9-5 Atlantic Coast) started hot in one of its biggest regular season games in program history, hitting three quick 3s to pump itself and the crowd. In front of a record-setting 11,021 fans, Syracuse seemed ready to avenge two losses to UND last year. Ready to make sure the outcome of the game would be as different as the atmosphere.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNo. 7 Notre Dame (25-3, 13-1) fought back every step of the way, and took its first lead early in the fourth quarter. Syracuse brought it back to a 3-point game but an Alexis Peterson heave with seconds left on the clock came up just short, as the Orange couldn’t finish off a monumental upset in an 85-80 loss on Sunday in the Carrier Dome.“We played a great three quarters,” Hillsman said.Notre Dame tilted the game back in its favor by using star big Briana Turner. In the first half, Turner mainly prowled the high post area. Syracuse was content to let her stay out there as it stopped UND’s forwards curling inside for looks.But in the second half, the cuts were inverted. Notre Dame’s forwards flashed to the high post, drawing out center Briana Day while Turner curled onto the inside, oftentimes finding herself matched up with an SU forward. Three straight buckets for Turner to start the fourth quarter turned a four-quarter deficit into the Fighting Irish’s first lead. She finished with a career-high 31 points.“She was getting on our forwards sometimes and it was just a mismatch from there,” Day said. “… it just threw us out of our defense.”Hillsman made adjustments too by subbing out forward Isabella Slim for center Bria Day with seven minutes left to play with extra size on the interior. Turner only made one more field goal the rest of the way.The Orange had found the way to slow down UND’s looks on the inside, but it failed to complete the defensive stand. SU surrendered eight offensive rebounds in the fourth quarter alone, including five in the last 3:57 of the game.On one play, Turner got fouled on a layup and missed the and-1 opportunity. Teammate Arike Ogunbowale corralled the layup and got an extra two points for UND instead. On another, SU forced UND into a 3-pointer with one second left on the shot clock. But the visitors grabbed a long rebound.One of the Orange’s goals, Hillsman said, was to have 20 more possessions than Notre Dame. SU won the turnover margin, but 18 offensive rebounds for UND, compared to Syracuse’s five, made achieving that goal impossible.“When they get those offensive rebounds … off of playing 25, 30 seconds of defense,” Sykes said, “it puts pressure on us to play another 30 and now we’re playing a whole minute.”Despite fourth-quarter errors, Syracuse fought back. Gabby Cooper hit a big 3-pointer to make it a four-point game with 36 seconds to go. Missed free throws by UND down the stretch gave the Orange one last chance to tie the game, before Peterson missed the 3-pointer.There’s no denying that the game was different for Syracuse. Eleven thousand people waited with baited breath as Peterson’s final shot soared through the air. The Orange’s total season attendance before today’s game was a little more than 17,000.Those fans arrived with higher expectations. Last year, SU played UND twice and did not lead once. On Sunday, the Orange led for three quarters and hung blow for blow with one of the premier programs in college basketball.Syracuse hoped that by changing everything else — the crowd, the expectation, the lineup — it would lead to a change in final result.But, just like Peterson’s 3-point attempt, the heave came up just short. Commentslast_img read more