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Garth Hudson, Taj Mahal, Warren Haynes, & More Celebrate The Last Waltz’s 40th Anniversary In LA


first_imgEdit this setlist | More Warren Haynes setlists There are few places in this or any universe where and when one could truly replicate The Last Waltz, the famed final show played by The Band on Thanksgiving of 1976. In 2012, Levon Helm, the group’s most iconic voice, passed on to That Great Gig in the Sky. In 2015, Allen Toussaint, the New Orleans legend who arranged the horn section for the original show, passed on.And that’s to say nothing of all the members of The Band and their special guests who are now either deceased or have aged out of regular performance.That hasn’t stopped the music from carrying on through a 40th anniversary tour of The Last Waltz. Nor did it to do anything to dampen the spirit of the stop at the Orpheum Theatre in downtown Los Angeles. The ornately decorated venue proved to be a perfect host for Warren Haynes, Jamey Johnson and the cast of characters who’ve criss-crossed the country reviving a rock-and-roll classic.From The Band standards like “Up on Cripple Creek”, “Rag Mama Rag”, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and (of course) “The Weight” to blues standards and then-contemporary covers, this band breathed new life into an epic concert that, save for the fortunate few who were at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco on that November night, is left to musical lore beyond Martin Scorsese‘s famous concert film.Haynes, among the most decorated fill-in frontman for historic rock outfits, wailed with voice and axe through two rambling sets (and a two-song encore) with every bit of bravado and brilliance on display during his stints with the Dead, the Allman Brothers Band and Gov’t Mule. Johnson, a relative spring chick at 41, more than held his own belting out numbers, including “Georgia On My Mind”, and flaunting flowing locks from his head and beard. They were backed by a colorful cast of characters on horns (led by Mark Mullins), drums (Terence Higgins) and keyboard (Danny Louis).No tribute to The Last Waltz would be complete without a stack of cameos, and this one was no exception. Dave Malone, of New Orleans’ Radiators fame, joined in for a rendition of CSNY‘s “Helpless” and The Band’s “This Wheel’s On Fire.” Cyril Neville, of the Meters and the Neville Brothers, lent his talents on percussion and vocals, even stealing the show for a spell during the Bo Diddley classic “Who Do You Love.” Taj Mahal—clad in a red shirt, black pants and a white hat—seized the stage on multiple occasions, to belt out “The Shape I’m In”, “Life Is a Carnival” and Bob Dylan‘s “Forever Young” and rip some steel guitar on Robert Johnson‘s “Kind Hearted Woman Blues.”The crowd, which came to its feet after just about every song, got many a joyful earful from some who were on stage for the original Last Waltz. Steady Rollin’ Bob Margolin, who was then a young understudy to the aged Muddy Waters, “laid some pipe” on slide guitar during a rendition of Muddy’s “Mannish Boy” and regaled the audience with tales of late-night jams with Dylan, Helm, Eric Clapton, Ronnie Wood and Paul Butterfield. Dr. John, with the clothing and countenance of the same Crescent City eccentric he (presumably) was 40 years ago, banged away on the piano and lent his gravelly voice to Bayou favorites like “Such a Night” and “Down South in New Orleans.”And while most of The Band has either retired or passed on, there was one member with enough juice left in the tank to join this gang on the road: Garth Hudson. The silver-haired 79-year-old needed a hand shuffling onto and off of the stage, but once he sat down at the piano, it was as if no time had passed since the original show. He tickled the ivories to perfection toward the end of the show and into “The Weight” before the group concluded Set No. 2 with Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released.”Who knows how many (if any) of the original Waltzers will be around for a 50th anniversary in 10 years? By then, with any luck, there will be a whole new generation of great musicians who are ready, willing and able to get the ghosts of The Band back together for yet another Last Waltz.Below you can view fan-shot videos of both sets, courtesy of Pay Myers: Enjoy the gallery below, courtesy of Brandon Weil.center_img Load remaining imageslast_img read more


This Brighton cottage has the perfect kitchen for a budding chef


first_img19 Bernard St, BrightonAmy and Nathan Van de Belt have made the decision to downsize from their Brighton cottage after living there for just over two years.Mr Van de Belt, a state facilities manager and former chef, designed his ideal kitchen at 19 Bernard St. 19 Bernard St, Brighton.“This included a dining room as there was not one before, a media/family room, a parents’ retreat with an ensuite and walk-in robe, and a covered deck.” A new kitchen was designed and installed, and the laundry and main bathroom were upgraded.With sunset views from the back deck, the couple said the home would suit another family.Raine & Horne – Chermside selling agent Zac McHardy said one of the best features of the home was being able to cook while still seeing the kids play in the back yard. Mr Hardy said the area was very community focused. 19 Bernard St, Brighton.More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019There is a servery that joins the kitchen to the dining room, allowing hosts to prepare while interacting with guests. The doors on the deck open up to make one big space for entertaining. Mrs Van de Belt, the owner of Voodoo Yoga at Sandgate, said major renovations had been done to the home. “We built a two-car carport at the front with terracotta roof tiles to match the house,” she said.“We wanted to ensure that we kept the streetscape of the 1955 cottage. We built an extension out the back, doubling the size of the house. 19 Bernard St, Brighton.The kitchen, perfect for dinner parties and degustation dinners, also suited Mrs Van de Belt, who could keep an eye on her children playing in the backyard while she was in the kitchen. 19 Bernard St, Brighton.“We find that people who don’t know much about Brighton and Sandgate are blown away with what it has to offer and the feeling they get when they do come down,” he said.last_img read more


Dutch schemes fail to push management fees below 0.5% threshold


first_imgManagement fees totalled €4.9bn, an increase of 22% compared to 2015. This is because fees tend to be calculated as a percentage of total assets.According to Johan van Soest, senior consultant at LCP, the main reason for the increase in fees was, however, an increase in performance fees.“We’ve noticed pension funds have been able to negotiate much better contract terms with their asset managers in recent years,” he said. “Still, these lower base fees do not compensate fully for an increase in performance fees.”Bpf Bouw, for example, recently reported it had managed to reduce fees paid to hedge fund managers from €37.9m to €30.8m. However, at the same time the fund said it had seen a €6m increase in performance fees since 2013. Large Dutch pension funds have not been able to push their investment management fees to below the 0.5% threshold, even though their assets under management increased by 28% in the past five years.Consultancy LCP looked at total management fees as a percentage of total assets for the seven largest occupational funds – ABP, PFZW, PMT, PME, BpfBouw, Vervoer and PGB – and three large company pension funds (Philips, Rabobank and Shell). Together, these funds administer two thirds of all Dutch pension assets.The average management fees the funds paid in 2019 totalled 0.51%, excluding transaction costs. This is only two basis points less than in 2015, though total assets under management of the 10 funds increased from €763bn to €973bn in 2019 (+28%).Including transaction costs of 0.09%, investment management fees totalled 0.6%, or €6.3bn. This compares to 0.61% in 2015.last_img read more


Ashwin, Vijay to miss IPL, Kohli out for part of tournament


first_img(REUTERS)-India’s bumper 13-test home season has taken a big toll on its players with a host of them set to miss at least part of the Indian Premier League with injuries.Royal Challengers Bangalore will be without captain Virat Kohli for at least the initial phase of the Twenty20 tournament as the India skipper recovers from a shoulder injury that forced him to miss the series-sealing final test win over Australia in Dharamsala.“His recovery will be assessed in the second week of April to determine an exact return to play date for IPL 2017,” the Indian cricket board (BCCI) said in a statement.South African AB de Villiers will lead the side in Kohli’s absence.Bangalore, who have already lost Australia paceman Mitchell Starc to injury, will also be without Lokesh Rahul for the entire tournament, with the India opener likely to undergo surgery on his left shoulder.Rahul’s India opening partner Murali Vijay, who plays for Kings XI Punjab, will undergo wrist surgery and is expected to miss the April 5-May 21 tournament.India spinner Ravichandran Ashwin will sit out the entire campaign for Rising Pune Supergiant as he recovers from groin pain, the BCCI said.Left-arm spinner Ravindra Jadeja and paceman Umesh Yadav will both miss the start of the tournament for Gujarat Lions and Kolkata Knight Riders respectively.Jadeja has problems with his spinning finger, while fast bowler Yadav has right hip and lower back soreness.A number of India’s test cricketers played through pain during the home season which included a 3-0 whitewash of New Zealand and a 4-0 defeat of England in a five-match series.India also beat Bangladesh in a one-off test before a 2-1 victory in a hard-fought four-test series against Australia.last_img read more